Creating Your Own Business Card

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While we’re working in paperless offices more and more, the business card remains a mainstay of business. For those who haven’t got a proper business card design, which you could hand out to prospective customers or collaborators, you are passing up an integral marketing opportunity.

Not all business cards are created equal, however. When it comes to creating unique business cards in Melbourne, we have to accept that we are living in a city in which the average small company can print design their own cards and purchase them from renowned online sellers for the purchase price of a dinner. But these cards are normally of a poor weight, and typically use twee clipart to link themselves to the company being promoted. What this signifies is that there are a whole lot of poorly designed business cards on the market. This is both a challenge and an opportunity: to stand out that you will need to create a layout that looks fantastic, and makes it possible to differentiate yourself. If you can make it tactile and texture pleasant in the hand, you will be well on your way. Make a card which has the potential to elevate your company over your competitors before the potential client has seen your site, and consider using business stationary to really stand out from the crowd. So, with that in mind we have brought together some of our best tips for creating effective, innovative business cards.

Remember basic design principles

It might seem obvious but it is worth mentioning that a business card is a piece of printed material just like any other. Because of this, the fundamental principles of paper-based design use to business cards:

  • Maintain all your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge
  • Work at 300dpi for best image reproduction
  • Make Sure You maintain a minimal size to your typography to keep legibility
  • Style in CMYK unless you are working exclusively with spot colours

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to lay their cards out, as this could enable you to achieve the ideal hierarchy of information in addition to make sure your orientation is sound (if you will need a reminder, have a look at our guide to grid concept).

Get creative within the limits

There are a few ‘standard’ sizes for business cards, depending on where you’re in the world (possibly because pocket sizes also vary slightly from country to country). 1 typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, though you’ll see a number of different sizes quoted on the net. Even though you just have a very small canvas, it’s still possible to get creative with the distance. Begin by thinking about the key information you need to include, which will typically be a name, telephone number and email address, then work your style around presenting this information in a creative manner.

Avoid common pitfalls

There are some common pitfalls to designing business cards, which it helps to be conscious of. The first and most obvious is to make certain you provide a bleed according to your own printer. This is often 3mm, but may be 5mm, so check! An Immediate way to add impact to your business card is to use a particular finish. Special finishes may include a foil blocking or metallic inks, and can add substantial cost to your print. What they provide, however, is the chance to make your card more tactile, visually impressive and memorable. If you’re uncertain how to approach this, have a look at our guide to creating special print finishes in InDesign. Different printers provide various options for endings, so talk to them to learn what they can do for you, and do not be afraid to visit a specialist if your normal printer only offers directly four-colour print.

Cut into your card

A great way to make your card unique would be to use a die-cut procedure to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You may either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, by way of instance), or you can cut shapes from the centre. Dies are expensive to create the very first time, although increasingly printers are providing laser-cut choices, which make it economical to make a die-cut appearance on shorter print-runs. In addition, don’t overlook letterpress as an alternative.

Create Your Own

If you are feeling creative, why not create your own business cards? You can discover letterpress kits on eBay at affordable prices, letting you convert any card stock into your own business card effortlessly. Or you may use one of these gorgeous free business card templates.

Double-check your art

This tip applies to each piece of printing work you do, but it is so crucial that it is worth repeating for business card layout. When sending your artwork off to the printing shop, ensure you’ve double-checked each and every detail. There is nothing worse than getting your cards back and finding a typo in the email address or name!

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10 Photography Marketing Ideas That Work

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You have launched your photography business; but now you need to find a way to get yourself some clients.

 

Traditional advertising, like an advertisement in a magazine or paper, is mostly useless. Do not waste your money unless you are investing in something like AdWords. Especially when there are several free photography marketing ideas you can implement.

 

Instead, envision having people love your photography company so much that they send all their friends your way. Think of what it would be like to appear #1 in Google for your desired keyword, and also to have sufficient people finding you to fulfil your profit goals without anxiety and without spending thousands of dollars on advertising.

 

It can happen.

 

It may Just take some time, but here are 10 photography marketing ideas that work like mad.

 

1. Google Business Pages

 

When you search on Google and include a place on your keyword, such as “Madison Wedding Photographer,” Google is currently placing their Google Business listings before the organic listings in their positions. These listings are free, so go and get one today!

 

It’s important to fully complete your profile and start getting reviews if you wish to appear in the local listings. Be certain to upload some photos also, as they occasionally appear there in the search results. It’s a terrific way to boost your chances of being found on Google when people are trying to find a photographer.

 

2. Automate your Social Networking posts

 

Social Media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and many others can be super helpful ways to promote your company using digital copywriting.

 

That being said, you must be super careful not to waste a whole lot of time on those platforms since they can be extremely distracting. I mean I will go on Facebook to place a post on my business page, and an hour later I am seeing cat movies and forgot to post completely.

 

The Battle is real, friends.

 

So, in order to keep from wasting too much time, use a free service such as IFTTT to automate your posts. This lets you post in a single place and have it automatically post the exact identical content on other programs. This is the way to get the best response with the least amount of time wasted.

 

3. Write blogs as often as you can

 

Having fresh web page content on your website is among the best ways to let Google know your is website active (that provides you better positions) and shows your clients that you’re busy. When I visit a website that has not been updated in a month or two, I often wonder if they’re still in business. If you do not have many shoots, distribute your articles (do a couple of pictures one at a time rather than all in one big post) or reveal some private work.

 

It’s also extremely valuable to blog about things your customers want to know. By way of instance, wedding photographers might want to put a series on their site with tips for brides for getting better wedding photos (for example, hiring a professional lighting company or not getting ready in the church kitchen) whereas portrait photographers can post about what to wear to an interview. Providing information to your customers allows them to appreciate you and see you as an authority and trusted business advisor regarding the topic.

 

You’ll also want to be certain that your website is optimized for search engines so you can attract clients that are looking for a photographer like you by searching the net, this is something a web agency could help with.

 

4. Start building an email list immediately

 

The more I learn about email advertising, the more I realize I should have started an email list straight away from the very start. I am not talking about buying some arbitrary list that folks are attempting to sell you. I’m referring to people that are interested in your job and opt-in for emails from you.

 

The beauty of this email list is that these customers already enjoy your work enough to give you their email address. They wish to hear about your organization and about the products you’re offering. They might even love your job enough that they need to get an email each time you update your site with new photographs. These individuals are priceless.

 

Wish to do a day of mini-sessions? Tell your Email list and give them the chance to sign up a day until you start it to the general public. Have a new product you’re offering? Inform your listing about it and entice them to purchase it.

 

You can Use MailChimp for free if you simply send out a basic newsletter from time to time, that is the absolute minimum you should do.

 

However, I highly suggest using ConvertKit. They do have a modest monthly fee to use their service, but the automation they supply will easily cover the cost, and it is going to cost you less than your monthly Starbucks budget and that’s well worth it.

 

5. Offer referral bonuses

 

Word of Mouth advertising is one of the most effective things you can have for propelling your business forward. A way to help promote that is to reward people for telling their friends about your organization and how amazing you are. I like to provide either a free print or a specific quantity of printing credit for my customers for each friend they refer to us that books a wedding or session. This is not free to deliver, but I am putting it in my “free” list since it is possible to pay for it out of their profits from their buddy who might not have booked with you anyway. It’s free to begin and promote.

 

6. Network with other professionals

 

Get involved with other professionals in the community area. It’s awesome how faithful business owners may be towards each other when you really hit it off. Be sure to promoting their companies to your customers, and they’ll make sure to reciprocate.

 

If you are a wedding photographer, it is important to network with other wedding professionals because you share customers but do not have to compete to be the best wedding photographer.

 

7. Run a contest or a promotion

 

I debated putting this one on here at all because some photographers give their work away for free for too long, but a contest or giveaway here and there can really help boost visibility to your company.

 

My friend Andy and I gave away free wedding pictures to a couple annually for the first 3 decades of our company as a means to give back to people, and while it’s been an incredibly rewarding thing to do on a personal level, it is not something which brings in a great deal of extra business. Our target market can manage higher-end photography, whereas individuals who enter a competition for something free frequently do so because they cannot afford the luxury item. It was shocking to me how a lot of individuals still met with us and booked us while the competition was open, but our target audience would rather book us than wait for the results of a competition but maybe lose their date.

 

To do this to get more customers, you need to be certain you’re reaching your intended audience.

 

8. Have customers recruit their friends

 

Offering a free gift or a small discount to individuals who find a couple of friends to all schedule photograph sessions on the same day can be a tremendous motivator for people to locate others to hire you too. Again, we are harnessing the power of word of mouth advertising, but it is so powerful that it cannot be ignored.

 

9. Get featured on picture blogs

 

There’s a ton of wedding and portrait sites out there that feature photography, and there are a few portrait sites that feature portrait photographers also. Get featured if it’s possible, then market it where your customers can see it. There is nothing wrong with reminding them how amazing you are. It is simply some strategic business advice.

 

10. Give back to the community

 

This not only gets your name out there, but it makes it possible to build relationships with other Professionals who might desire your services or refer you to people they know. There are very few organizations who would turn down free photography policy for their event. Consider donating a session into a cause that is important to you. Or provide up a free session as part of a silent auction. The possibilities here are endless.

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How to Make Money as an Artist Doing What You Love

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Sharon Louden graduated with her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) from Yale in 1991 with $US115,000 worth of debt.

She has since settled all her student loans by selling her own art work, however it was not easy. As a professional artist, there was no roadmap to follow as she strove to pursue her craft and maintain a roof over her head. Enter “Living and Sustaining a Creative Life,” the publication Louden edited featuring candid essays by 40 working artists on how they make a living as an artist.

That kind of commercial talk is mostly absent in today’s art program. Dozens of MFA students are pushed to the real world with no clue on how to market their own work and themselves. Artist David Humphry said that the business side of art was very much like bathroom talk – very intimate.

The leading artists shared their stories of doing everything from painting houses and teaching to understanding and using Craigslist jobs and investing in real estate or undertaking home extensions to maintain their creative practices. Below are some tips on how artists create a living doing what they love move – being an artist.

  1. Network with artists, authors, and buyers

As uncomfortable as it may be for an artist to leave the sanctity of the studio, nothing gets marketed without interacting with authors that will draw attention to the art, the 500 or so well-to-do people who are considering buying art, along with the other artists that can give introductions to their art world relations. Think about it, when you were young, you would talk to everybody.

Your career gains its own momentum as soon as you start meeting people. Artists rely a lot on other musicians and you cannot miss that generosity. It is also very important to purchase other artists’ work. When times get tough, artists can sell the work in their collections or exchange on the notion of being an active participant in the market.

  1. Focus on your finances and make a budget

Take a look at your finances as it will save you in the long run. A lot of artists have the goal of wanting an art career and will sacrifice almost everything to the art. However, be reasonable with how you spend the money you do receive from your work. If it is choosing between paying your lease, installing timber beams or visiting Miami for an Art exhibition, consider your financial situation and perhaps sit the exhibition out.

By becoming more accountable, even if that means going for jobs that pay better, you are securing a greater financial gain. By primarily making money by selling your art work, but also working odd jobs that fulfil your imaginative practice allow you to develop your creative skills but also have money flowing in.

  1. Plan ahead and choose internships that count

If you wait to think about your career until you first graduate, you are already way behind. By interning in the industry you want to work in, such as an art gallery, not a warehouse that sells architectural timbers, you gain invaluable experience which are beneficial for your own self-promotion in gaining paid work in the future.

People just assume that if you’re at a gallery, all that work is sold and you are living well, but that’s not the situation. A lot of that art goes back to that particular person’s studio. Having gallery representation is not always the answer to economic stability.

  1. Open a gallery, treat it as a business

Contributing artist Austin Thomas started investing in real estate in Brooklyn, and a year and a half ago, she opened a gallery space in Manhattan called Pocket Utopia.

Owning your own business provides you the most flexibility whatsoever.  You decide when you’re closed and open. By opening an art gallery you may feel like you are even more influential in the art world since you might be selling other artists’ works thus attempting to create money for yourself and them.

  1. Get used to playing the real estate game

You may need to move your studio a number of times depending on competing businesses and your current situation. You may need to expand or perhaps downsize, however being flexible and understanding the real estate market is crucial.  Consider a house extension or add-on as a gallery as well.

  1. Only go into teaching if you like it

If you do not have a passion for teaching, do not go into it.  Many people see teaching as a ‘fall-back’ option but if you do not have a passion for it, it will make your job very unenjoyable.

  1. Make the Most of the down market

The art market crashed in 1986 with the economy. Leading artist Brian Tolle informed Business Insider, that although it wasn’t a great moment to graduate, the depressed economy meant the market was searching for affordable cheap options, where youthful artists flourished as a result. The expectations were so low that it was easier to break in and when the economy began to recover, they were already well set up.

Today Tolle regularly succeeds in creating work on the budgets of public art work committees. He often receives a flat fee that needs to cover his expenses and time in generating these huge projects. Tolle has three works he will install this spring: one in Canada, one in Houston, Tex., and one in Brooklyn.

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A Walk of Art

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Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

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Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

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There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

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Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Creating Your Own Business Card

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While we’re working in paperless offices more and more, the business card remains a mainstay of business. For those who haven’t got a proper business card design, which you could hand out to prospective customers or collaborators, you are passing up an integral marketing opportunity.

Not all business cards are created equal, however. When it comes to creating unique business cards in Melbourne, we have to accept that we are living in a city in which the average small company can print design their own cards and purchase them from renowned online sellers for the purchase price of a dinner. But these cards are normally of a poor weight, and typically use twee clipart to link themselves to the company being promoted. What this signifies is that there are a whole lot of poorly designed business cards on the market. This is both a challenge and an opportunity: to stand out that you will need to create a layout that looks fantastic, and makes it possible to differentiate yourself. If you can make it tactile and texture pleasant in the hand, you will be well on your way. Make a card which has the potential to elevate your company over your competitors before the potential client has seen your site, and consider using business stationary to really stand out from the crowd. So, with that in mind we have brought together some of our best tips for creating effective, innovative business cards.

Remember basic design principles

It might seem obvious but it is worth mentioning that a business card is a piece of printed material just like any other. Because of this, the fundamental principles of paper-based design use to business cards:

  • Maintain all your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge
  • Work at 300dpi for best image reproduction
  • Make Sure You maintain a minimal size to your typography to keep legibility
  • Style in CMYK unless you are working exclusively with spot colours

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to lay their cards out, as this could enable you to achieve the ideal hierarchy of information in addition to make sure your orientation is sound (if you will need a reminder, have a look at our guide to grid concept).

Get creative within the limits

There are a few ‘standard’ sizes for business cards, depending on where you’re in the world (possibly because pocket sizes also vary slightly from country to country). 1 typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, though you’ll see a number of different sizes quoted on the net. Even though you just have a very small canvas, it’s still possible to get creative with the distance. Begin by thinking about the key information you need to include, which will typically be a name, telephone number and email address, then work your style around presenting this information in a creative manner.

Avoid common pitfalls

There are some common pitfalls to designing business cards, which it helps to be conscious of. The first and most obvious is to make certain you provide a bleed according to your own printer. This is often 3mm, but may be 5mm, so check! An Immediate way to add impact to your business card is to use a particular finish. Special finishes may include a foil blocking or metallic inks, and can add substantial cost to your print. What they provide, however, is the chance to make your card more tactile, visually impressive and memorable. If you’re uncertain how to approach this, have a look at our guide to creating special print finishes in InDesign. Different printers provide various options for endings, so talk to them to learn what they can do for you, and do not be afraid to visit a specialist if your normal printer only offers directly four-colour print.

Cut into your card

A great way to make your card unique would be to use a die-cut procedure to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You may either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, by way of instance), or you can cut shapes from the centre. Dies are expensive to create the very first time, although increasingly printers are providing laser-cut choices, which make it economical to make a die-cut appearance on shorter print-runs. In addition, don’t overlook letterpress as an alternative.

Create Your Own

If you are feeling creative, why not create your own business cards? You can discover letterpress kits on eBay at affordable prices, letting you convert any card stock into your own business card effortlessly. Or you may use one of these gorgeous free business card templates.

Double-check your art

This tip applies to each piece of printing work you do, but it is so crucial that it is worth repeating for business card layout. When sending your artwork off to the printing shop, ensure you’ve double-checked each and every detail. There is nothing worse than getting your cards back and finding a typo in the email address or name!

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10 Photography Marketing Ideas That Work

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You have launched your photography business; but now you need to find a way to get yourself some clients.

 

Traditional advertising, like an advertisement in a magazine or paper, is mostly useless. Do not waste your money unless you are investing in something like AdWords. Especially when there are several free photography marketing ideas you can implement.

 

Instead, envision having people love your photography company so much that they send all their friends your way. Think of what it would be like to appear #1 in Google for your desired keyword, and also to have sufficient people finding you to fulfil your profit goals without anxiety and without spending thousands of dollars on advertising.

 

It can happen.

 

It may Just take some time, but here are 10 photography marketing ideas that work like mad.

 

1. Google Business Pages

 

When you search on Google and include a place on your keyword, such as “Madison Wedding Photographer,” Google is currently placing their Google Business listings before the organic listings in their positions. These listings are free, so go and get one today!

 

It’s important to fully complete your profile and start getting reviews if you wish to appear in the local listings. Be certain to upload some photos also, as they occasionally appear there in the search results. It’s a terrific way to boost your chances of being found on Google when people are trying to find a photographer.

 

2. Automate your Social Networking posts

 

Social Media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and many others can be super helpful ways to promote your company using digital copywriting.

 

That being said, you must be super careful not to waste a whole lot of time on those platforms since they can be extremely distracting. I mean I will go on Facebook to place a post on my business page, and an hour later I am seeing cat movies and forgot to post completely.

 

The Battle is real, friends.

 

So, in order to keep from wasting too much time, use a free service such as IFTTT to automate your posts. This lets you post in a single place and have it automatically post the exact identical content on other programs. This is the way to get the best response with the least amount of time wasted.

 

3. Write blogs as often as you can

 

Having fresh web page content on your website is among the best ways to let Google know your is website active (that provides you better positions) and shows your clients that you’re busy. When I visit a website that has not been updated in a month or two, I often wonder if they’re still in business. If you do not have many shoots, distribute your articles (do a couple of pictures one at a time rather than all in one big post) or reveal some private work.

 

It’s also extremely valuable to blog about things your customers want to know. By way of instance, wedding photographers might want to put a series on their site with tips for brides for getting better wedding photos (for example, hiring a professional lighting company or not getting ready in the church kitchen) whereas portrait photographers can post about what to wear to an interview. Providing information to your customers allows them to appreciate you and see you as an authority and trusted business advisor regarding the topic.

 

You’ll also want to be certain that your website is optimized for search engines so you can attract clients that are looking for a photographer like you by searching the net, this is something a web agency could help with.

 

4. Start building an email list immediately

 

The more I learn about email advertising, the more I realize I should have started an email list straight away from the very start. I am not talking about buying some arbitrary list that folks are attempting to sell you. I’m referring to people that are interested in your job and opt-in for emails from you.

 

The beauty of this email list is that these customers already enjoy your work enough to give you their email address. They wish to hear about your organization and about the products you’re offering. They might even love your job enough that they need to get an email each time you update your site with new photographs. These individuals are priceless.

 

Wish to do a day of mini-sessions? Tell your Email list and give them the chance to sign up a day until you start it to the general public. Have a new product you’re offering? Inform your listing about it and entice them to purchase it.

 

You can Use MailChimp for free if you simply send out a basic newsletter from time to time, that is the absolute minimum you should do.

 

However, I highly suggest using ConvertKit. They do have a modest monthly fee to use their service, but the automation they supply will easily cover the cost, and it is going to cost you less than your monthly Starbucks budget and that’s well worth it.

 

5. Offer referral bonuses

 

Word of Mouth advertising is one of the most effective things you can have for propelling your business forward. A way to help promote that is to reward people for telling their friends about your organization and how amazing you are. I like to provide either a free print or a specific quantity of printing credit for my customers for each friend they refer to us that books a wedding or session. This is not free to deliver, but I am putting it in my “free” list since it is possible to pay for it out of their profits from their buddy who might not have booked with you anyway. It’s free to begin and promote.

 

6. Network with other professionals

 

Get involved with other professionals in the community area. It’s awesome how faithful business owners may be towards each other when you really hit it off. Be sure to promoting their companies to your customers, and they’ll make sure to reciprocate.

 

If you are a wedding photographer, it is important to network with other wedding professionals because you share customers but do not have to compete to be the best wedding photographer.

 

7. Run a contest or a promotion

 

I debated putting this one on here at all because some photographers give their work away for free for too long, but a contest or giveaway here and there can really help boost visibility to your company.

 

My friend Andy and I gave away free wedding pictures to a couple annually for the first 3 decades of our company as a means to give back to people, and while it’s been an incredibly rewarding thing to do on a personal level, it is not something which brings in a great deal of extra business. Our target market can manage higher-end photography, whereas individuals who enter a competition for something free frequently do so because they cannot afford the luxury item. It was shocking to me how a lot of individuals still met with us and booked us while the competition was open, but our target audience would rather book us than wait for the results of a competition but maybe lose their date.

 

To do this to get more customers, you need to be certain you’re reaching your intended audience.

 

8. Have customers recruit their friends

 

Offering a free gift or a small discount to individuals who find a couple of friends to all schedule photograph sessions on the same day can be a tremendous motivator for people to locate others to hire you too. Again, we are harnessing the power of word of mouth advertising, but it is so powerful that it cannot be ignored.

 

9. Get featured on picture blogs

 

There’s a ton of wedding and portrait sites out there that feature photography, and there are a few portrait sites that feature portrait photographers also. Get featured if it’s possible, then market it where your customers can see it. There is nothing wrong with reminding them how amazing you are. It is simply some strategic business advice.

 

10. Give back to the community

 

This not only gets your name out there, but it makes it possible to build relationships with other Professionals who might desire your services or refer you to people they know. There are very few organizations who would turn down free photography policy for their event. Consider donating a session into a cause that is important to you. Or provide up a free session as part of a silent auction. The possibilities here are endless.

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How to Make Money as an Artist Doing What You Love

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Sharon Louden graduated with her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) from Yale in 1991 with $US115,000 worth of debt.

She has since settled all her student loans by selling her own art work, however it was not easy. As a professional artist, there was no roadmap to follow as she strove to pursue her craft and maintain a roof over her head. Enter “Living and Sustaining a Creative Life,” the publication Louden edited featuring candid essays by 40 working artists on how they make a living as an artist.

That kind of commercial talk is mostly absent in today’s art program. Dozens of MFA students are pushed to the real world with no clue on how to market their own work and themselves. Artist David Humphry said that the business side of art was very much like bathroom talk – very intimate.

The leading artists shared their stories of doing everything from painting houses and teaching to understanding and using Craigslist jobs and investing in real estate or undertaking home extensions to maintain their creative practices. Below are some tips on how artists create a living doing what they love move – being an artist.

  1. Network with artists, authors, and buyers

As uncomfortable as it may be for an artist to leave the sanctity of the studio, nothing gets marketed without interacting with authors that will draw attention to the art, the 500 or so well-to-do people who are considering buying art, along with the other artists that can give introductions to their art world relations. Think about it, when you were young, you would talk to everybody.

Your career gains its own momentum as soon as you start meeting people. Artists rely a lot on other musicians and you cannot miss that generosity. It is also very important to purchase other artists’ work. When times get tough, artists can sell the work in their collections or exchange on the notion of being an active participant in the market.

  1. Focus on your finances and make a budget

Take a look at your finances as it will save you in the long run. A lot of artists have the goal of wanting an art career and will sacrifice almost everything to the art. However, be reasonable with how you spend the money you do receive from your work. If it is choosing between paying your lease, installing timber beams or visiting Miami for an Art exhibition, consider your financial situation and perhaps sit the exhibition out.

By becoming more accountable, even if that means going for jobs that pay better, you are securing a greater financial gain. By primarily making money by selling your art work, but also working odd jobs that fulfil your imaginative practice allow you to develop your creative skills but also have money flowing in.

  1. Plan ahead and choose internships that count

If you wait to think about your career until you first graduate, you are already way behind. By interning in the industry you want to work in, such as an art gallery, not a warehouse that sells architectural timbers, you gain invaluable experience which are beneficial for your own self-promotion in gaining paid work in the future.

People just assume that if you’re at a gallery, all that work is sold and you are living well, but that’s not the situation. A lot of that art goes back to that particular person’s studio. Having gallery representation is not always the answer to economic stability.

  1. Open a gallery, treat it as a business

Contributing artist Austin Thomas started investing in real estate in Brooklyn, and a year and a half ago, she opened a gallery space in Manhattan called Pocket Utopia.

Owning your own business provides you the most flexibility whatsoever.  You decide when you’re closed and open. By opening an art gallery you may feel like you are even more influential in the art world since you might be selling other artists’ works thus attempting to create money for yourself and them.

  1. Get used to playing the real estate game

You may need to move your studio a number of times depending on competing businesses and your current situation. You may need to expand or perhaps downsize, however being flexible and understanding the real estate market is crucial.  Consider a house extension or add-on as a gallery as well.

  1. Only go into teaching if you like it

If you do not have a passion for teaching, do not go into it.  Many people see teaching as a ‘fall-back’ option but if you do not have a passion for it, it will make your job very unenjoyable.

  1. Make the Most of the down market

The art market crashed in 1986 with the economy. Leading artist Brian Tolle informed Business Insider, that although it wasn’t a great moment to graduate, the depressed economy meant the market was searching for affordable cheap options, where youthful artists flourished as a result. The expectations were so low that it was easier to break in and when the economy began to recover, they were already well set up.

Today Tolle regularly succeeds in creating work on the budgets of public art work committees. He often receives a flat fee that needs to cover his expenses and time in generating these huge projects. Tolle has three works he will install this spring: one in Canada, one in Houston, Tex., and one in Brooklyn.

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A Walk of Art

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Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

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Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

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There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

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Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Creating Your Own Business Card

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While we’re working in paperless offices more and more, the business card remains a mainstay of business. For those who haven’t got a proper business card design, which you could hand out to prospective customers or collaborators, you are passing up an integral marketing opportunity.

Not all business cards are created equal, however. When it comes to creating unique business cards in Melbourne, we have to accept that we are living in a city in which the average small company can print design their own cards and purchase them from renowned online sellers for the purchase price of a dinner. But these cards are normally of a poor weight, and typically use twee clipart to link themselves to the company being promoted. What this signifies is that there are a whole lot of poorly designed business cards on the market. This is both a challenge and an opportunity: to stand out that you will need to create a layout that looks fantastic, and makes it possible to differentiate yourself. If you can make it tactile and texture pleasant in the hand, you will be well on your way. Make a card which has the potential to elevate your company over your competitors before the potential client has seen your site, and consider using business stationary to really stand out from the crowd. So, with that in mind we have brought together some of our best tips for creating effective, innovative business cards.

Remember basic design principles

It might seem obvious but it is worth mentioning that a business card is a piece of printed material just like any other. Because of this, the fundamental principles of paper-based design use to business cards:

  • Maintain all your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge
  • Work at 300dpi for best image reproduction
  • Make Sure You maintain a minimal size to your typography to keep legibility
  • Style in CMYK unless you are working exclusively with spot colours

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to lay their cards out, as this could enable you to achieve the ideal hierarchy of information in addition to make sure your orientation is sound (if you will need a reminder, have a look at our guide to grid concept).

Get creative within the limits

There are a few ‘standard’ sizes for business cards, depending on where you’re in the world (possibly because pocket sizes also vary slightly from country to country). 1 typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, though you’ll see a number of different sizes quoted on the net. Even though you just have a very small canvas, it’s still possible to get creative with the distance. Begin by thinking about the key information you need to include, which will typically be a name, telephone number and email address, then work your style around presenting this information in a creative manner.

Avoid common pitfalls

There are some common pitfalls to designing business cards, which it helps to be conscious of. The first and most obvious is to make certain you provide a bleed according to your own printer. This is often 3mm, but may be 5mm, so check! An Immediate way to add impact to your business card is to use a particular finish. Special finishes may include a foil blocking or metallic inks, and can add substantial cost to your print. What they provide, however, is the chance to make your card more tactile, visually impressive and memorable. If you’re uncertain how to approach this, have a look at our guide to creating special print finishes in InDesign. Different printers provide various options for endings, so talk to them to learn what they can do for you, and do not be afraid to visit a specialist if your normal printer only offers directly four-colour print.

Cut into your card

A great way to make your card unique would be to use a die-cut procedure to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You may either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, by way of instance), or you can cut shapes from the centre. Dies are expensive to create the very first time, although increasingly printers are providing laser-cut choices, which make it economical to make a die-cut appearance on shorter print-runs. In addition, don’t overlook letterpress as an alternative.

Create Your Own

If you are feeling creative, why not create your own business cards? You can discover letterpress kits on eBay at affordable prices, letting you convert any card stock into your own business card effortlessly. Or you may use one of these gorgeous free business card templates.

Double-check your art

This tip applies to each piece of printing work you do, but it is so crucial that it is worth repeating for business card layout. When sending your artwork off to the printing shop, ensure you’ve double-checked each and every detail. There is nothing worse than getting your cards back and finding a typo in the email address or name!

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10 Photography Marketing Ideas That Work

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You have launched your photography business; but now you need to find a way to get yourself some clients.

 

Traditional advertising, like an advertisement in a magazine or paper, is mostly useless. Do not waste your money unless you are investing in something like AdWords. Especially when there are several free photography marketing ideas you can implement.

 

Instead, envision having people love your photography company so much that they send all their friends your way. Think of what it would be like to appear #1 in Google for your desired keyword, and also to have sufficient people finding you to fulfil your profit goals without anxiety and without spending thousands of dollars on advertising.

 

It can happen.

 

It may Just take some time, but here are 10 photography marketing ideas that work like mad.

 

1. Google Business Pages

 

When you search on Google and include a place on your keyword, such as “Madison Wedding Photographer,” Google is currently placing their Google Business listings before the organic listings in their positions. These listings are free, so go and get one today!

 

It’s important to fully complete your profile and start getting reviews if you wish to appear in the local listings. Be certain to upload some photos also, as they occasionally appear there in the search results. It’s a terrific way to boost your chances of being found on Google when people are trying to find a photographer.

 

2. Automate your Social Networking posts

 

Social Media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and many others can be super helpful ways to promote your company using digital copywriting.

 

That being said, you must be super careful not to waste a whole lot of time on those platforms since they can be extremely distracting. I mean I will go on Facebook to place a post on my business page, and an hour later I am seeing cat movies and forgot to post completely.

 

The Battle is real, friends.

 

So, in order to keep from wasting too much time, use a free service such as IFTTT to automate your posts. This lets you post in a single place and have it automatically post the exact identical content on other programs. This is the way to get the best response with the least amount of time wasted.

 

3. Write blogs as often as you can

 

Having fresh web page content on your website is among the best ways to let Google know your is website active (that provides you better positions) and shows your clients that you’re busy. When I visit a website that has not been updated in a month or two, I often wonder if they’re still in business. If you do not have many shoots, distribute your articles (do a couple of pictures one at a time rather than all in one big post) or reveal some private work.

 

It’s also extremely valuable to blog about things your customers want to know. By way of instance, wedding photographers might want to put a series on their site with tips for brides for getting better wedding photos (for example, hiring a professional lighting company or not getting ready in the church kitchen) whereas portrait photographers can post about what to wear to an interview. Providing information to your customers allows them to appreciate you and see you as an authority and trusted business advisor regarding the topic.

 

You’ll also want to be certain that your website is optimized for search engines so you can attract clients that are looking for a photographer like you by searching the net, this is something a web agency could help with.

 

4. Start building an email list immediately

 

The more I learn about email advertising, the more I realize I should have started an email list straight away from the very start. I am not talking about buying some arbitrary list that folks are attempting to sell you. I’m referring to people that are interested in your job and opt-in for emails from you.

 

The beauty of this email list is that these customers already enjoy your work enough to give you their email address. They wish to hear about your organization and about the products you’re offering. They might even love your job enough that they need to get an email each time you update your site with new photographs. These individuals are priceless.

 

Wish to do a day of mini-sessions? Tell your Email list and give them the chance to sign up a day until you start it to the general public. Have a new product you’re offering? Inform your listing about it and entice them to purchase it.

 

You can Use MailChimp for free if you simply send out a basic newsletter from time to time, that is the absolute minimum you should do.

 

However, I highly suggest using ConvertKit. They do have a modest monthly fee to use their service, but the automation they supply will easily cover the cost, and it is going to cost you less than your monthly Starbucks budget and that’s well worth it.

 

5. Offer referral bonuses

 

Word of Mouth advertising is one of the most effective things you can have for propelling your business forward. A way to help promote that is to reward people for telling their friends about your organization and how amazing you are. I like to provide either a free print or a specific quantity of printing credit for my customers for each friend they refer to us that books a wedding or session. This is not free to deliver, but I am putting it in my “free” list since it is possible to pay for it out of their profits from their buddy who might not have booked with you anyway. It’s free to begin and promote.

 

6. Network with other professionals

 

Get involved with other professionals in the community area. It’s awesome how faithful business owners may be towards each other when you really hit it off. Be sure to promoting their companies to your customers, and they’ll make sure to reciprocate.

 

If you are a wedding photographer, it is important to network with other wedding professionals because you share customers but do not have to compete to be the best wedding photographer.

 

7. Run a contest or a promotion

 

I debated putting this one on here at all because some photographers give their work away for free for too long, but a contest or giveaway here and there can really help boost visibility to your company.

 

My friend Andy and I gave away free wedding pictures to a couple annually for the first 3 decades of our company as a means to give back to people, and while it’s been an incredibly rewarding thing to do on a personal level, it is not something which brings in a great deal of extra business. Our target market can manage higher-end photography, whereas individuals who enter a competition for something free frequently do so because they cannot afford the luxury item. It was shocking to me how a lot of individuals still met with us and booked us while the competition was open, but our target audience would rather book us than wait for the results of a competition but maybe lose their date.

 

To do this to get more customers, you need to be certain you’re reaching your intended audience.

 

8. Have customers recruit their friends

 

Offering a free gift or a small discount to individuals who find a couple of friends to all schedule photograph sessions on the same day can be a tremendous motivator for people to locate others to hire you too. Again, we are harnessing the power of word of mouth advertising, but it is so powerful that it cannot be ignored.

 

9. Get featured on picture blogs

 

There’s a ton of wedding and portrait sites out there that feature photography, and there are a few portrait sites that feature portrait photographers also. Get featured if it’s possible, then market it where your customers can see it. There is nothing wrong with reminding them how amazing you are. It is simply some strategic business advice.

 

10. Give back to the community

 

This not only gets your name out there, but it makes it possible to build relationships with other Professionals who might desire your services or refer you to people they know. There are very few organizations who would turn down free photography policy for their event. Consider donating a session into a cause that is important to you. Or provide up a free session as part of a silent auction. The possibilities here are endless.

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How to Make Money as an Artist Doing What You Love

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Sharon Louden graduated with her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) from Yale in 1991 with $US115,000 worth of debt.

She has since settled all her student loans by selling her own art work, however it was not easy. As a professional artist, there was no roadmap to follow as she strove to pursue her craft and maintain a roof over her head. Enter “Living and Sustaining a Creative Life,” the publication Louden edited featuring candid essays by 40 working artists on how they make a living as an artist.

That kind of commercial talk is mostly absent in today’s art program. Dozens of MFA students are pushed to the real world with no clue on how to market their own work and themselves. Artist David Humphry said that the business side of art was very much like bathroom talk – very intimate.

The leading artists shared their stories of doing everything from painting houses and teaching to understanding and using Craigslist jobs and investing in real estate or undertaking home extensions to maintain their creative practices. Below are some tips on how artists create a living doing what they love move – being an artist.

  1. Network with artists, authors, and buyers

As uncomfortable as it may be for an artist to leave the sanctity of the studio, nothing gets marketed without interacting with authors that will draw attention to the art, the 500 or so well-to-do people who are considering buying art, along with the other artists that can give introductions to their art world relations. Think about it, when you were young, you would talk to everybody.

Your career gains its own momentum as soon as you start meeting people. Artists rely a lot on other musicians and you cannot miss that generosity. It is also very important to purchase other artists’ work. When times get tough, artists can sell the work in their collections or exchange on the notion of being an active participant in the market.

  1. Focus on your finances and make a budget

Take a look at your finances as it will save you in the long run. A lot of artists have the goal of wanting an art career and will sacrifice almost everything to the art. However, be reasonable with how you spend the money you do receive from your work. If it is choosing between paying your lease, installing timber beams or visiting Miami for an Art exhibition, consider your financial situation and perhaps sit the exhibition out.

By becoming more accountable, even if that means going for jobs that pay better, you are securing a greater financial gain. By primarily making money by selling your art work, but also working odd jobs that fulfil your imaginative practice allow you to develop your creative skills but also have money flowing in.

  1. Plan ahead and choose internships that count

If you wait to think about your career until you first graduate, you are already way behind. By interning in the industry you want to work in, such as an art gallery, not a warehouse that sells architectural timbers, you gain invaluable experience which are beneficial for your own self-promotion in gaining paid work in the future.

People just assume that if you’re at a gallery, all that work is sold and you are living well, but that’s not the situation. A lot of that art goes back to that particular person’s studio. Having gallery representation is not always the answer to economic stability.

  1. Open a gallery, treat it as a business

Contributing artist Austin Thomas started investing in real estate in Brooklyn, and a year and a half ago, she opened a gallery space in Manhattan called Pocket Utopia.

Owning your own business provides you the most flexibility whatsoever.  You decide when you’re closed and open. By opening an art gallery you may feel like you are even more influential in the art world since you might be selling other artists’ works thus attempting to create money for yourself and them.

  1. Get used to playing the real estate game

You may need to move your studio a number of times depending on competing businesses and your current situation. You may need to expand or perhaps downsize, however being flexible and understanding the real estate market is crucial.  Consider a house extension or add-on as a gallery as well.

  1. Only go into teaching if you like it

If you do not have a passion for teaching, do not go into it.  Many people see teaching as a ‘fall-back’ option but if you do not have a passion for it, it will make your job very unenjoyable.

  1. Make the Most of the down market

The art market crashed in 1986 with the economy. Leading artist Brian Tolle informed Business Insider, that although it wasn’t a great moment to graduate, the depressed economy meant the market was searching for affordable cheap options, where youthful artists flourished as a result. The expectations were so low that it was easier to break in and when the economy began to recover, they were already well set up.

Today Tolle regularly succeeds in creating work on the budgets of public art work committees. He often receives a flat fee that needs to cover his expenses and time in generating these huge projects. Tolle has three works he will install this spring: one in Canada, one in Houston, Tex., and one in Brooklyn.

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A Walk of Art

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Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

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Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

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There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

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Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Creating Your Own Business Card

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While we’re working in paperless offices more and more, the business card remains a mainstay of business. For those who haven’t got a proper business card design, which you could hand out to prospective customers or collaborators, you are passing up an integral marketing opportunity.

Not all business cards are created equal, however. When it comes to creating unique business cards in Melbourne, we have to accept that we are living in a city in which the average small company can print design their own cards and purchase them from renowned online sellers for the purchase price of a dinner. But these cards are normally of a poor weight, and typically use twee clipart to link themselves to the company being promoted. What this signifies is that there are a whole lot of poorly designed business cards on the market. This is both a challenge and an opportunity: to stand out that you will need to create a layout that looks fantastic, and makes it possible to differentiate yourself. If you can make it tactile and texture pleasant in the hand, you will be well on your way. Make a card which has the potential to elevate your company over your competitors before the potential client has seen your site, and consider using business stationary to really stand out from the crowd. So, with that in mind we have brought together some of our best tips for creating effective, innovative business cards.

Remember basic design principles

It might seem obvious but it is worth mentioning that a business card is a piece of printed material just like any other. Because of this, the fundamental principles of paper-based design use to business cards:

  • Maintain all your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge
  • Work at 300dpi for best image reproduction
  • Make Sure You maintain a minimal size to your typography to keep legibility
  • Style in CMYK unless you are working exclusively with spot colours

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to lay their cards out, as this could enable you to achieve the ideal hierarchy of information in addition to make sure your orientation is sound (if you will need a reminder, have a look at our guide to grid concept).

Get creative within the limits

There are a few ‘standard’ sizes for business cards, depending on where you’re in the world (possibly because pocket sizes also vary slightly from country to country). 1 typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, though you’ll see a number of different sizes quoted on the net. Even though you just have a very small canvas, it’s still possible to get creative with the distance. Begin by thinking about the key information you need to include, which will typically be a name, telephone number and email address, then work your style around presenting this information in a creative manner.

Avoid common pitfalls

There are some common pitfalls to designing business cards, which it helps to be conscious of. The first and most obvious is to make certain you provide a bleed according to your own printer. This is often 3mm, but may be 5mm, so check! An Immediate way to add impact to your business card is to use a particular finish. Special finishes may include a foil blocking or metallic inks, and can add substantial cost to your print. What they provide, however, is the chance to make your card more tactile, visually impressive and memorable. If you’re uncertain how to approach this, have a look at our guide to creating special print finishes in InDesign. Different printers provide various options for endings, so talk to them to learn what they can do for you, and do not be afraid to visit a specialist if your normal printer only offers directly four-colour print.

Cut into your card

A great way to make your card unique would be to use a die-cut procedure to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You may either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, by way of instance), or you can cut shapes from the centre. Dies are expensive to create the very first time, although increasingly printers are providing laser-cut choices, which make it economical to make a die-cut appearance on shorter print-runs. In addition, don’t overlook letterpress as an alternative.

Create Your Own

If you are feeling creative, why not create your own business cards? You can discover letterpress kits on eBay at affordable prices, letting you convert any card stock into your own business card effortlessly. Or you may use one of these gorgeous free business card templates.

Double-check your art

This tip applies to each piece of printing work you do, but it is so crucial that it is worth repeating for business card layout. When sending your artwork off to the printing shop, ensure you’ve double-checked each and every detail. There is nothing worse than getting your cards back and finding a typo in the email address or name!

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10 Photography Marketing Ideas That Work

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You have launched your photography business; but now you need to find a way to get yourself some clients.

 

Traditional advertising, like an advertisement in a magazine or paper, is mostly useless. Do not waste your money unless you are investing in something like AdWords. Especially when there are several free photography marketing ideas you can implement.

 

Instead, envision having people love your photography company so much that they send all their friends your way. Think of what it would be like to appear #1 in Google for your desired keyword, and also to have sufficient people finding you to fulfil your profit goals without anxiety and without spending thousands of dollars on advertising.

 

It can happen.

 

It may Just take some time, but here are 10 photography marketing ideas that work like mad.

 

1. Google Business Pages

 

When you search on Google and include a place on your keyword, such as “Madison Wedding Photographer,” Google is currently placing their Google Business listings before the organic listings in their positions. These listings are free, so go and get one today!

 

It’s important to fully complete your profile and start getting reviews if you wish to appear in the local listings. Be certain to upload some photos also, as they occasionally appear there in the search results. It’s a terrific way to boost your chances of being found on Google when people are trying to find a photographer.

 

2. Automate your Social Networking posts

 

Social Media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and many others can be super helpful ways to promote your company using digital copywriting.

 

That being said, you must be super careful not to waste a whole lot of time on those platforms since they can be extremely distracting. I mean I will go on Facebook to place a post on my business page, and an hour later I am seeing cat movies and forgot to post completely.

 

The Battle is real, friends.

 

So, in order to keep from wasting too much time, use a free service such as IFTTT to automate your posts. This lets you post in a single place and have it automatically post the exact identical content on other programs. This is the way to get the best response with the least amount of time wasted.

 

3. Write blogs as often as you can

 

Having fresh web page content on your website is among the best ways to let Google know your is website active (that provides you better positions) and shows your clients that you’re busy. When I visit a website that has not been updated in a month or two, I often wonder if they’re still in business. If you do not have many shoots, distribute your articles (do a couple of pictures one at a time rather than all in one big post) or reveal some private work.

 

It’s also extremely valuable to blog about things your customers want to know. By way of instance, wedding photographers might want to put a series on their site with tips for brides for getting better wedding photos (for example, hiring a professional lighting company or not getting ready in the church kitchen) whereas portrait photographers can post about what to wear to an interview. Providing information to your customers allows them to appreciate you and see you as an authority and trusted business advisor regarding the topic.

 

You’ll also want to be certain that your website is optimized for search engines so you can attract clients that are looking for a photographer like you by searching the net, this is something a web agency could help with.

 

4. Start building an email list immediately

 

The more I learn about email advertising, the more I realize I should have started an email list straight away from the very start. I am not talking about buying some arbitrary list that folks are attempting to sell you. I’m referring to people that are interested in your job and opt-in for emails from you.

 

The beauty of this email list is that these customers already enjoy your work enough to give you their email address. They wish to hear about your organization and about the products you’re offering. They might even love your job enough that they need to get an email each time you update your site with new photographs. These individuals are priceless.

 

Wish to do a day of mini-sessions? Tell your Email list and give them the chance to sign up a day until you start it to the general public. Have a new product you’re offering? Inform your listing about it and entice them to purchase it.

 

You can Use MailChimp for free if you simply send out a basic newsletter from time to time, that is the absolute minimum you should do.

 

However, I highly suggest using ConvertKit. They do have a modest monthly fee to use their service, but the automation they supply will easily cover the cost, and it is going to cost you less than your monthly Starbucks budget and that’s well worth it.

 

5. Offer referral bonuses

 

Word of Mouth advertising is one of the most effective things you can have for propelling your business forward. A way to help promote that is to reward people for telling their friends about your organization and how amazing you are. I like to provide either a free print or a specific quantity of printing credit for my customers for each friend they refer to us that books a wedding or session. This is not free to deliver, but I am putting it in my “free” list since it is possible to pay for it out of their profits from their buddy who might not have booked with you anyway. It’s free to begin and promote.

 

6. Network with other professionals

 

Get involved with other professionals in the community area. It’s awesome how faithful business owners may be towards each other when you really hit it off. Be sure to promoting their companies to your customers, and they’ll make sure to reciprocate.

 

If you are a wedding photographer, it is important to network with other wedding professionals because you share customers but do not have to compete to be the best wedding photographer.

 

7. Run a contest or a promotion

 

I debated putting this one on here at all because some photographers give their work away for free for too long, but a contest or giveaway here and there can really help boost visibility to your company.

 

My friend Andy and I gave away free wedding pictures to a couple annually for the first 3 decades of our company as a means to give back to people, and while it’s been an incredibly rewarding thing to do on a personal level, it is not something which brings in a great deal of extra business. Our target market can manage higher-end photography, whereas individuals who enter a competition for something free frequently do so because they cannot afford the luxury item. It was shocking to me how a lot of individuals still met with us and booked us while the competition was open, but our target audience would rather book us than wait for the results of a competition but maybe lose their date.

 

To do this to get more customers, you need to be certain you’re reaching your intended audience.

 

8. Have customers recruit their friends

 

Offering a free gift or a small discount to individuals who find a couple of friends to all schedule photograph sessions on the same day can be a tremendous motivator for people to locate others to hire you too. Again, we are harnessing the power of word of mouth advertising, but it is so powerful that it cannot be ignored.

 

9. Get featured on picture blogs

 

There’s a ton of wedding and portrait sites out there that feature photography, and there are a few portrait sites that feature portrait photographers also. Get featured if it’s possible, then market it where your customers can see it. There is nothing wrong with reminding them how amazing you are. It is simply some strategic business advice.

 

10. Give back to the community

 

This not only gets your name out there, but it makes it possible to build relationships with other Professionals who might desire your services or refer you to people they know. There are very few organizations who would turn down free photography policy for their event. Consider donating a session into a cause that is important to you. Or provide up a free session as part of a silent auction. The possibilities here are endless.

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How to Make Money as an Artist Doing What You Love

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Sharon Louden graduated with her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) from Yale in 1991 with $US115,000 worth of debt.

She has since settled all her student loans by selling her own art work, however it was not easy. As a professional artist, there was no roadmap to follow as she strove to pursue her craft and maintain a roof over her head. Enter “Living and Sustaining a Creative Life,” the publication Louden edited featuring candid essays by 40 working artists on how they make a living as an artist.

That kind of commercial talk is mostly absent in today’s art program. Dozens of MFA students are pushed to the real world with no clue on how to market their own work and themselves. Artist David Humphry said that the business side of art was very much like bathroom talk – very intimate.

The leading artists shared their stories of doing everything from painting houses and teaching to understanding and using Craigslist jobs and investing in real estate or undertaking home extensions to maintain their creative practices. Below are some tips on how artists create a living doing what they love move – being an artist.

  1. Network with artists, authors, and buyers

As uncomfortable as it may be for an artist to leave the sanctity of the studio, nothing gets marketed without interacting with authors that will draw attention to the art, the 500 or so well-to-do people who are considering buying art, along with the other artists that can give introductions to their art world relations. Think about it, when you were young, you would talk to everybody.

Your career gains its own momentum as soon as you start meeting people. Artists rely a lot on other musicians and you cannot miss that generosity. It is also very important to purchase other artists’ work. When times get tough, artists can sell the work in their collections or exchange on the notion of being an active participant in the market.

  1. Focus on your finances and make a budget

Take a look at your finances as it will save you in the long run. A lot of artists have the goal of wanting an art career and will sacrifice almost everything to the art. However, be reasonable with how you spend the money you do receive from your work. If it is choosing between paying your lease, installing timber beams or visiting Miami for an Art exhibition, consider your financial situation and perhaps sit the exhibition out.

By becoming more accountable, even if that means going for jobs that pay better, you are securing a greater financial gain. By primarily making money by selling your art work, but also working odd jobs that fulfil your imaginative practice allow you to develop your creative skills but also have money flowing in.

  1. Plan ahead and choose internships that count

If you wait to think about your career until you first graduate, you are already way behind. By interning in the industry you want to work in, such as an art gallery, not a warehouse that sells architectural timbers, you gain invaluable experience which are beneficial for your own self-promotion in gaining paid work in the future.

People just assume that if you’re at a gallery, all that work is sold and you are living well, but that’s not the situation. A lot of that art goes back to that particular person’s studio. Having gallery representation is not always the answer to economic stability.

  1. Open a gallery, treat it as a business

Contributing artist Austin Thomas started investing in real estate in Brooklyn, and a year and a half ago, she opened a gallery space in Manhattan called Pocket Utopia.

Owning your own business provides you the most flexibility whatsoever.  You decide when you’re closed and open. By opening an art gallery you may feel like you are even more influential in the art world since you might be selling other artists’ works thus attempting to create money for yourself and them.

  1. Get used to playing the real estate game

You may need to move your studio a number of times depending on competing businesses and your current situation. You may need to expand or perhaps downsize, however being flexible and understanding the real estate market is crucial.  Consider a house extension or add-on as a gallery as well.

  1. Only go into teaching if you like it

If you do not have a passion for teaching, do not go into it.  Many people see teaching as a ‘fall-back’ option but if you do not have a passion for it, it will make your job very unenjoyable.

  1. Make the Most of the down market

The art market crashed in 1986 with the economy. Leading artist Brian Tolle informed Business Insider, that although it wasn’t a great moment to graduate, the depressed economy meant the market was searching for affordable cheap options, where youthful artists flourished as a result. The expectations were so low that it was easier to break in and when the economy began to recover, they were already well set up.

Today Tolle regularly succeeds in creating work on the budgets of public art work committees. He often receives a flat fee that needs to cover his expenses and time in generating these huge projects. Tolle has three works he will install this spring: one in Canada, one in Houston, Tex., and one in Brooklyn.

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A Walk of Art

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Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

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Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

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There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

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Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Creating Your Own Business Card

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While we’re working in paperless offices more and more, the business card remains a mainstay of business. For those who haven’t got a proper business card design, which you could hand out to prospective customers or collaborators, you are passing up an integral marketing opportunity.

Not all business cards are created equal, however. When it comes to creating unique business cards in Melbourne, we have to accept that we are living in a city in which the average small company can print design their own cards and purchase them from renowned online sellers for the purchase price of a dinner. But these cards are normally of a poor weight, and typically use twee clipart to link themselves to the company being promoted. What this signifies is that there are a whole lot of poorly designed business cards on the market. This is both a challenge and an opportunity: to stand out that you will need to create a layout that looks fantastic, and makes it possible to differentiate yourself. If you can make it tactile and texture pleasant in the hand, you will be well on your way. Make a card which has the potential to elevate your company over your competitors before the potential client has seen your site, and consider using business stationary to really stand out from the crowd. So, with that in mind we have brought together some of our best tips for creating effective, innovative business cards.

Remember basic design principles

It might seem obvious but it is worth mentioning that a business card is a piece of printed material just like any other. Because of this, the fundamental principles of paper-based design use to business cards:

  • Maintain all your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge
  • Work at 300dpi for best image reproduction
  • Make Sure You maintain a minimal size to your typography to keep legibility
  • Style in CMYK unless you are working exclusively with spot colours

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to lay their cards out, as this could enable you to achieve the ideal hierarchy of information in addition to make sure your orientation is sound (if you will need a reminder, have a look at our guide to grid concept).

Get creative within the limits

There are a few ‘standard’ sizes for business cards, depending on where you’re in the world (possibly because pocket sizes also vary slightly from country to country). 1 typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, though you’ll see a number of different sizes quoted on the net. Even though you just have a very small canvas, it’s still possible to get creative with the distance. Begin by thinking about the key information you need to include, which will typically be a name, telephone number and email address, then work your style around presenting this information in a creative manner.

Avoid common pitfalls

There are some common pitfalls to designing business cards, which it helps to be conscious of. The first and most obvious is to make certain you provide a bleed according to your own printer. This is often 3mm, but may be 5mm, so check! An Immediate way to add impact to your business card is to use a particular finish. Special finishes may include a foil blocking or metallic inks, and can add substantial cost to your print. What they provide, however, is the chance to make your card more tactile, visually impressive and memorable. If you’re uncertain how to approach this, have a look at our guide to creating special print finishes in InDesign. Different printers provide various options for endings, so talk to them to learn what they can do for you, and do not be afraid to visit a specialist if your normal printer only offers directly four-colour print.

Cut into your card

A great way to make your card unique would be to use a die-cut procedure to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You may either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, by way of instance), or you can cut shapes from the centre. Dies are expensive to create the very first time, although increasingly printers are providing laser-cut choices, which make it economical to make a die-cut appearance on shorter print-runs. In addition, don’t overlook letterpress as an alternative.

Create Your Own

If you are feeling creative, why not create your own business cards? You can discover letterpress kits on eBay at affordable prices, letting you convert any card stock into your own business card effortlessly. Or you may use one of these gorgeous free business card templates.

Double-check your art

This tip applies to each piece of printing work you do, but it is so crucial that it is worth repeating for business card layout. When sending your artwork off to the printing shop, ensure you’ve double-checked each and every detail. There is nothing worse than getting your cards back and finding a typo in the email address or name!

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10 Photography Marketing Ideas That Work

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You have launched your photography business; but now you need to find a way to get yourself some clients.

 

Traditional advertising, like an advertisement in a magazine or paper, is mostly useless. Do not waste your money unless you are investing in something like AdWords. Especially when there are several free photography marketing ideas you can implement.

 

Instead, envision having people love your photography company so much that they send all their friends your way. Think of what it would be like to appear #1 in Google for your desired keyword, and also to have sufficient people finding you to fulfil your profit goals without anxiety and without spending thousands of dollars on advertising.

 

It can happen.

 

It may Just take some time, but here are 10 photography marketing ideas that work like mad.

 

1. Google Business Pages

 

When you search on Google and include a place on your keyword, such as “Madison Wedding Photographer,” Google is currently placing their Google Business listings before the organic listings in their positions. These listings are free, so go and get one today!

 

It’s important to fully complete your profile and start getting reviews if you wish to appear in the local listings. Be certain to upload some photos also, as they occasionally appear there in the search results. It’s a terrific way to boost your chances of being found on Google when people are trying to find a photographer.

 

2. Automate your Social Networking posts

 

Social Media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and many others can be super helpful ways to promote your company using digital copywriting.

 

That being said, you must be super careful not to waste a whole lot of time on those platforms since they can be extremely distracting. I mean I will go on Facebook to place a post on my business page, and an hour later I am seeing cat movies and forgot to post completely.

 

The Battle is real, friends.

 

So, in order to keep from wasting too much time, use a free service such as IFTTT to automate your posts. This lets you post in a single place and have it automatically post the exact identical content on other programs. This is the way to get the best response with the least amount of time wasted.

 

3. Write blogs as often as you can

 

Having fresh web page content on your website is among the best ways to let Google know your is website active (that provides you better positions) and shows your clients that you’re busy. When I visit a website that has not been updated in a month or two, I often wonder if they’re still in business. If you do not have many shoots, distribute your articles (do a couple of pictures one at a time rather than all in one big post) or reveal some private work.

 

It’s also extremely valuable to blog about things your customers want to know. By way of instance, wedding photographers might want to put a series on their site with tips for brides for getting better wedding photos (for example, hiring a professional lighting company or not getting ready in the church kitchen) whereas portrait photographers can post about what to wear to an interview. Providing information to your customers allows them to appreciate you and see you as an authority and trusted business advisor regarding the topic.

 

You’ll also want to be certain that your website is optimized for search engines so you can attract clients that are looking for a photographer like you by searching the net, this is something a web agency could help with.

 

4. Start building an email list immediately

 

The more I learn about email advertising, the more I realize I should have started an email list straight away from the very start. I am not talking about buying some arbitrary list that folks are attempting to sell you. I’m referring to people that are interested in your job and opt-in for emails from you.

 

The beauty of this email list is that these customers already enjoy your work enough to give you their email address. They wish to hear about your organization and about the products you’re offering. They might even love your job enough that they need to get an email each time you update your site with new photographs. These individuals are priceless.

 

Wish to do a day of mini-sessions? Tell your Email list and give them the chance to sign up a day until you start it to the general public. Have a new product you’re offering? Inform your listing about it and entice them to purchase it.

 

You can Use MailChimp for free if you simply send out a basic newsletter from time to time, that is the absolute minimum you should do.

 

However, I highly suggest using ConvertKit. They do have a modest monthly fee to use their service, but the automation they supply will easily cover the cost, and it is going to cost you less than your monthly Starbucks budget and that’s well worth it.

 

5. Offer referral bonuses

 

Word of Mouth advertising is one of the most effective things you can have for propelling your business forward. A way to help promote that is to reward people for telling their friends about your organization and how amazing you are. I like to provide either a free print or a specific quantity of printing credit for my customers for each friend they refer to us that books a wedding or session. This is not free to deliver, but I am putting it in my “free” list since it is possible to pay for it out of their profits from their buddy who might not have booked with you anyway. It’s free to begin and promote.

 

6. Network with other professionals

 

Get involved with other professionals in the community area. It’s awesome how faithful business owners may be towards each other when you really hit it off. Be sure to promoting their companies to your customers, and they’ll make sure to reciprocate.

 

If you are a wedding photographer, it is important to network with other wedding professionals because you share customers but do not have to compete to be the best wedding photographer.

 

7. Run a contest or a promotion

 

I debated putting this one on here at all because some photographers give their work away for free for too long, but a contest or giveaway here and there can really help boost visibility to your company.

 

My friend Andy and I gave away free wedding pictures to a couple annually for the first 3 decades of our company as a means to give back to people, and while it’s been an incredibly rewarding thing to do on a personal level, it is not something which brings in a great deal of extra business. Our target market can manage higher-end photography, whereas individuals who enter a competition for something free frequently do so because they cannot afford the luxury item. It was shocking to me how a lot of individuals still met with us and booked us while the competition was open, but our target audience would rather book us than wait for the results of a competition but maybe lose their date.

 

To do this to get more customers, you need to be certain you’re reaching your intended audience.

 

8. Have customers recruit their friends

 

Offering a free gift or a small discount to individuals who find a couple of friends to all schedule photograph sessions on the same day can be a tremendous motivator for people to locate others to hire you too. Again, we are harnessing the power of word of mouth advertising, but it is so powerful that it cannot be ignored.

 

9. Get featured on picture blogs

 

There’s a ton of wedding and portrait sites out there that feature photography, and there are a few portrait sites that feature portrait photographers also. Get featured if it’s possible, then market it where your customers can see it. There is nothing wrong with reminding them how amazing you are. It is simply some strategic business advice.

 

10. Give back to the community

 

This not only gets your name out there, but it makes it possible to build relationships with other Professionals who might desire your services or refer you to people they know. There are very few organizations who would turn down free photography policy for their event. Consider donating a session into a cause that is important to you. Or provide up a free session as part of a silent auction. The possibilities here are endless.

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How to Make Money as an Artist Doing What You Love

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Sharon Louden graduated with her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) from Yale in 1991 with $US115,000 worth of debt.

She has since settled all her student loans by selling her own art work, however it was not easy. As a professional artist, there was no roadmap to follow as she strove to pursue her craft and maintain a roof over her head. Enter “Living and Sustaining a Creative Life,” the publication Louden edited featuring candid essays by 40 working artists on how they make a living as an artist.

That kind of commercial talk is mostly absent in today’s art program. Dozens of MFA students are pushed to the real world with no clue on how to market their own work and themselves. Artist David Humphry said that the business side of art was very much like bathroom talk – very intimate.

The leading artists shared their stories of doing everything from painting houses and teaching to understanding and using Craigslist jobs and investing in real estate or undertaking home extensions to maintain their creative practices. Below are some tips on how artists create a living doing what they love move – being an artist.

  1. Network with artists, authors, and buyers

As uncomfortable as it may be for an artist to leave the sanctity of the studio, nothing gets marketed without interacting with authors that will draw attention to the art, the 500 or so well-to-do people who are considering buying art, along with the other artists that can give introductions to their art world relations. Think about it, when you were young, you would talk to everybody.

Your career gains its own momentum as soon as you start meeting people. Artists rely a lot on other musicians and you cannot miss that generosity. It is also very important to purchase other artists’ work. When times get tough, artists can sell the work in their collections or exchange on the notion of being an active participant in the market.

  1. Focus on your finances and make a budget

Take a look at your finances as it will save you in the long run. A lot of artists have the goal of wanting an art career and will sacrifice almost everything to the art. However, be reasonable with how you spend the money you do receive from your work. If it is choosing between paying your lease, installing timber beams or visiting Miami for an Art exhibition, consider your financial situation and perhaps sit the exhibition out.

By becoming more accountable, even if that means going for jobs that pay better, you are securing a greater financial gain. By primarily making money by selling your art work, but also working odd jobs that fulfil your imaginative practice allow you to develop your creative skills but also have money flowing in.

  1. Plan ahead and choose internships that count

If you wait to think about your career until you first graduate, you are already way behind. By interning in the industry you want to work in, such as an art gallery, not a warehouse that sells architectural timbers, you gain invaluable experience which are beneficial for your own self-promotion in gaining paid work in the future.

People just assume that if you’re at a gallery, all that work is sold and you are living well, but that’s not the situation. A lot of that art goes back to that particular person’s studio. Having gallery representation is not always the answer to economic stability.

  1. Open a gallery, treat it as a business

Contributing artist Austin Thomas started investing in real estate in Brooklyn, and a year and a half ago, she opened a gallery space in Manhattan called Pocket Utopia.

Owning your own business provides you the most flexibility whatsoever.  You decide when you’re closed and open. By opening an art gallery you may feel like you are even more influential in the art world since you might be selling other artists’ works thus attempting to create money for yourself and them.

  1. Get used to playing the real estate game

You may need to move your studio a number of times depending on competing businesses and your current situation. You may need to expand or perhaps downsize, however being flexible and understanding the real estate market is crucial.  Consider a house extension or add-on as a gallery as well.

  1. Only go into teaching if you like it

If you do not have a passion for teaching, do not go into it.  Many people see teaching as a ‘fall-back’ option but if you do not have a passion for it, it will make your job very unenjoyable.

  1. Make the Most of the down market

The art market crashed in 1986 with the economy. Leading artist Brian Tolle informed Business Insider, that although it wasn’t a great moment to graduate, the depressed economy meant the market was searching for affordable cheap options, where youthful artists flourished as a result. The expectations were so low that it was easier to break in and when the economy began to recover, they were already well set up.

Today Tolle regularly succeeds in creating work on the budgets of public art work committees. He often receives a flat fee that needs to cover his expenses and time in generating these huge projects. Tolle has three works he will install this spring: one in Canada, one in Houston, Tex., and one in Brooklyn.

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A Walk of Art

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Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

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Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

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There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

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Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Creating Your Own Business Card

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While we’re working in paperless offices more and more, the business card remains a mainstay of business. For those who haven’t got a proper business card design, which you could hand out to prospective customers or collaborators, you are passing up an integral marketing opportunity.

Not all business cards are created equal, however. When it comes to creating unique business cards in Melbourne, we have to accept that we are living in a city in which the average small company can print design their own cards and purchase them from renowned online sellers for the purchase price of a dinner. But these cards are normally of a poor weight, and typically use twee clipart to link themselves to the company being promoted. What this signifies is that there are a whole lot of poorly designed business cards on the market. This is both a challenge and an opportunity: to stand out that you will need to create a layout that looks fantastic, and makes it possible to differentiate yourself. If you can make it tactile and texture pleasant in the hand, you will be well on your way. Make a card which has the potential to elevate your company over your competitors before the potential client has seen your site, and consider using business stationary to really stand out from the crowd. So, with that in mind we have brought together some of our best tips for creating effective, innovative business cards.

Remember basic design principles

It might seem obvious but it is worth mentioning that a business card is a piece of printed material just like any other. Because of this, the fundamental principles of paper-based design use to business cards:

  • Maintain all your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge
  • Work at 300dpi for best image reproduction
  • Make Sure You maintain a minimal size to your typography to keep legibility
  • Style in CMYK unless you are working exclusively with spot colours

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to lay their cards out, as this could enable you to achieve the ideal hierarchy of information in addition to make sure your orientation is sound (if you will need a reminder, have a look at our guide to grid concept).

Get creative within the limits

There are a few ‘standard’ sizes for business cards, depending on where you’re in the world (possibly because pocket sizes also vary slightly from country to country). 1 typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, though you’ll see a number of different sizes quoted on the net. Even though you just have a very small canvas, it’s still possible to get creative with the distance. Begin by thinking about the key information you need to include, which will typically be a name, telephone number and email address, then work your style around presenting this information in a creative manner.

Avoid common pitfalls

There are some common pitfalls to designing business cards, which it helps to be conscious of. The first and most obvious is to make certain you provide a bleed according to your own printer. This is often 3mm, but may be 5mm, so check! An Immediate way to add impact to your business card is to use a particular finish. Special finishes may include a foil blocking or metallic inks, and can add substantial cost to your print. What they provide, however, is the chance to make your card more tactile, visually impressive and memorable. If you’re uncertain how to approach this, have a look at our guide to creating special print finishes in InDesign. Different printers provide various options for endings, so talk to them to learn what they can do for you, and do not be afraid to visit a specialist if your normal printer only offers directly four-colour print.

Cut into your card

A great way to make your card unique would be to use a die-cut procedure to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You may either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, by way of instance), or you can cut shapes from the centre. Dies are expensive to create the very first time, although increasingly printers are providing laser-cut choices, which make it economical to make a die-cut appearance on shorter print-runs. In addition, don’t overlook letterpress as an alternative.

Create Your Own

If you are feeling creative, why not create your own business cards? You can discover letterpress kits on eBay at affordable prices, letting you convert any card stock into your own business card effortlessly. Or you may use one of these gorgeous free business card templates.

Double-check your art

This tip applies to each piece of printing work you do, but it is so crucial that it is worth repeating for business card layout. When sending your artwork off to the printing shop, ensure you’ve double-checked each and every detail. There is nothing worse than getting your cards back and finding a typo in the email address or name!

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10 Photography Marketing Ideas That Work

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You have launched your photography business; but now you need to find a way to get yourself some clients.

 

Traditional advertising, like an advertisement in a magazine or paper, is mostly useless. Do not waste your money unless you are investing in something like AdWords. Especially when there are several free photography marketing ideas you can implement.

 

Instead, envision having people love your photography company so much that they send all their friends your way. Think of what it would be like to appear #1 in Google for your desired keyword, and also to have sufficient people finding you to fulfil your profit goals without anxiety and without spending thousands of dollars on advertising.

 

It can happen.

 

It may Just take some time, but here are 10 photography marketing ideas that work like mad.

 

1. Google Business Pages

 

When you search on Google and include a place on your keyword, such as “Madison Wedding Photographer,” Google is currently placing their Google Business listings before the organic listings in their positions. These listings are free, so go and get one today!

 

It’s important to fully complete your profile and start getting reviews if you wish to appear in the local listings. Be certain to upload some photos also, as they occasionally appear there in the search results. It’s a terrific way to boost your chances of being found on Google when people are trying to find a photographer.

 

2. Automate your Social Networking posts

 

Social Media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and many others can be super helpful ways to promote your company using digital copywriting.

 

That being said, you must be super careful not to waste a whole lot of time on those platforms since they can be extremely distracting. I mean I will go on Facebook to place a post on my business page, and an hour later I am seeing cat movies and forgot to post completely.

 

The Battle is real, friends.

 

So, in order to keep from wasting too much time, use a free service such as IFTTT to automate your posts. This lets you post in a single place and have it automatically post the exact identical content on other programs. This is the way to get the best response with the least amount of time wasted.

 

3. Write blogs as often as you can

 

Having fresh web page content on your website is among the best ways to let Google know your is website active (that provides you better positions) and shows your clients that you’re busy. When I visit a website that has not been updated in a month or two, I often wonder if they’re still in business. If you do not have many shoots, distribute your articles (do a couple of pictures one at a time rather than all in one big post) or reveal some private work.

 

It’s also extremely valuable to blog about things your customers want to know. By way of instance, wedding photographers might want to put a series on their site with tips for brides for getting better wedding photos (for example, hiring a professional lighting company or not getting ready in the church kitchen) whereas portrait photographers can post about what to wear to an interview. Providing information to your customers allows them to appreciate you and see you as an authority and trusted business advisor regarding the topic.

 

You’ll also want to be certain that your website is optimized for search engines so you can attract clients that are looking for a photographer like you by searching the net, this is something a web agency could help with.

 

4. Start building an email list immediately

 

The more I learn about email advertising, the more I realize I should have started an email list straight away from the very start. I am not talking about buying some arbitrary list that folks are attempting to sell you. I’m referring to people that are interested in your job and opt-in for emails from you.

 

The beauty of this email list is that these customers already enjoy your work enough to give you their email address. They wish to hear about your organization and about the products you’re offering. They might even love your job enough that they need to get an email each time you update your site with new photographs. These individuals are priceless.

 

Wish to do a day of mini-sessions? Tell your Email list and give them the chance to sign up a day until you start it to the general public. Have a new product you’re offering? Inform your listing about it and entice them to purchase it.

 

You can Use MailChimp for free if you simply send out a basic newsletter from time to time, that is the absolute minimum you should do.

 

However, I highly suggest using ConvertKit. They do have a modest monthly fee to use their service, but the automation they supply will easily cover the cost, and it is going to cost you less than your monthly Starbucks budget and that’s well worth it.

 

5. Offer referral bonuses

 

Word of Mouth advertising is one of the most effective things you can have for propelling your business forward. A way to help promote that is to reward people for telling their friends about your organization and how amazing you are. I like to provide either a free print or a specific quantity of printing credit for my customers for each friend they refer to us that books a wedding or session. This is not free to deliver, but I am putting it in my “free” list since it is possible to pay for it out of their profits from their buddy who might not have booked with you anyway. It’s free to begin and promote.

 

6. Network with other professionals

 

Get involved with other professionals in the community area. It’s awesome how faithful business owners may be towards each other when you really hit it off. Be sure to promoting their companies to your customers, and they’ll make sure to reciprocate.

 

If you are a wedding photographer, it is important to network with other wedding professionals because you share customers but do not have to compete to be the best wedding photographer.

 

7. Run a contest or a promotion

 

I debated putting this one on here at all because some photographers give their work away for free for too long, but a contest or giveaway here and there can really help boost visibility to your company.

 

My friend Andy and I gave away free wedding pictures to a couple annually for the first 3 decades of our company as a means to give back to people, and while it’s been an incredibly rewarding thing to do on a personal level, it is not something which brings in a great deal of extra business. Our target market can manage higher-end photography, whereas individuals who enter a competition for something free frequently do so because they cannot afford the luxury item. It was shocking to me how a lot of individuals still met with us and booked us while the competition was open, but our target audience would rather book us than wait for the results of a competition but maybe lose their date.

 

To do this to get more customers, you need to be certain you’re reaching your intended audience.

 

8. Have customers recruit their friends

 

Offering a free gift or a small discount to individuals who find a couple of friends to all schedule photograph sessions on the same day can be a tremendous motivator for people to locate others to hire you too. Again, we are harnessing the power of word of mouth advertising, but it is so powerful that it cannot be ignored.

 

9. Get featured on picture blogs

 

There’s a ton of wedding and portrait sites out there that feature photography, and there are a few portrait sites that feature portrait photographers also. Get featured if it’s possible, then market it where your customers can see it. There is nothing wrong with reminding them how amazing you are. It is simply some strategic business advice.

 

10. Give back to the community

 

This not only gets your name out there, but it makes it possible to build relationships with other Professionals who might desire your services or refer you to people they know. There are very few organizations who would turn down free photography policy for their event. Consider donating a session into a cause that is important to you. Or provide up a free session as part of a silent auction. The possibilities here are endless.

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How to Make Money as an Artist Doing What You Love

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Sharon Louden graduated with her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) from Yale in 1991 with $US115,000 worth of debt.

She has since settled all her student loans by selling her own art work, however it was not easy. As a professional artist, there was no roadmap to follow as she strove to pursue her craft and maintain a roof over her head. Enter “Living and Sustaining a Creative Life,” the publication Louden edited featuring candid essays by 40 working artists on how they make a living as an artist.

That kind of commercial talk is mostly absent in today’s art program. Dozens of MFA students are pushed to the real world with no clue on how to market their own work and themselves. Artist David Humphry said that the business side of art was very much like bathroom talk – very intimate.

The leading artists shared their stories of doing everything from painting houses and teaching to understanding and using Craigslist jobs and investing in real estate or undertaking home extensions to maintain their creative practices. Below are some tips on how artists create a living doing what they love move – being an artist.

  1. Network with artists, authors, and buyers

As uncomfortable as it may be for an artist to leave the sanctity of the studio, nothing gets marketed without interacting with authors that will draw attention to the art, the 500 or so well-to-do people who are considering buying art, along with the other artists that can give introductions to their art world relations. Think about it, when you were young, you would talk to everybody.

Your career gains its own momentum as soon as you start meeting people. Artists rely a lot on other musicians and you cannot miss that generosity. It is also very important to purchase other artists’ work. When times get tough, artists can sell the work in their collections or exchange on the notion of being an active participant in the market.

  1. Focus on your finances and make a budget

Take a look at your finances as it will save you in the long run. A lot of artists have the goal of wanting an art career and will sacrifice almost everything to the art. However, be reasonable with how you spend the money you do receive from your work. If it is choosing between paying your lease, installing timber beams or visiting Miami for an Art exhibition, consider your financial situation and perhaps sit the exhibition out.

By becoming more accountable, even if that means going for jobs that pay better, you are securing a greater financial gain. By primarily making money by selling your art work, but also working odd jobs that fulfil your imaginative practice allow you to develop your creative skills but also have money flowing in.

  1. Plan ahead and choose internships that count

If you wait to think about your career until you first graduate, you are already way behind. By interning in the industry you want to work in, such as an art gallery, not a warehouse that sells architectural timbers, you gain invaluable experience which are beneficial for your own self-promotion in gaining paid work in the future.

People just assume that if you’re at a gallery, all that work is sold and you are living well, but that’s not the situation. A lot of that art goes back to that particular person’s studio. Having gallery representation is not always the answer to economic stability.

  1. Open a gallery, treat it as a business

Contributing artist Austin Thomas started investing in real estate in Brooklyn, and a year and a half ago, she opened a gallery space in Manhattan called Pocket Utopia.

Owning your own business provides you the most flexibility whatsoever.  You decide when you’re closed and open. By opening an art gallery you may feel like you are even more influential in the art world since you might be selling other artists’ works thus attempting to create money for yourself and them.

  1. Get used to playing the real estate game

You may need to move your studio a number of times depending on competing businesses and your current situation. You may need to expand or perhaps downsize, however being flexible and understanding the real estate market is crucial.  Consider a house extension or add-on as a gallery as well.

  1. Only go into teaching if you like it

If you do not have a passion for teaching, do not go into it.  Many people see teaching as a ‘fall-back’ option but if you do not have a passion for it, it will make your job very unenjoyable.

  1. Make the Most of the down market

The art market crashed in 1986 with the economy. Leading artist Brian Tolle informed Business Insider, that although it wasn’t a great moment to graduate, the depressed economy meant the market was searching for affordable cheap options, where youthful artists flourished as a result. The expectations were so low that it was easier to break in and when the economy began to recover, they were already well set up.

Today Tolle regularly succeeds in creating work on the budgets of public art work committees. He often receives a flat fee that needs to cover his expenses and time in generating these huge projects. Tolle has three works he will install this spring: one in Canada, one in Houston, Tex., and one in Brooklyn.

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A Walk of Art

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Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

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Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

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There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

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Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Creating Your Own Business Card

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While we’re working in paperless offices more and more, the business card remains a mainstay of business. For those who haven’t got a proper business card design, which you could hand out to prospective customers or collaborators, you are passing up an integral marketing opportunity.

Not all business cards are created equal, however. When it comes to creating unique business cards in Melbourne, we have to accept that we are living in a city in which the average small company can print design their own cards and purchase them from renowned online sellers for the purchase price of a dinner. But these cards are normally of a poor weight, and typically use twee clipart to link themselves to the company being promoted. What this signifies is that there are a whole lot of poorly designed business cards on the market. This is both a challenge and an opportunity: to stand out that you will need to create a layout that looks fantastic, and makes it possible to differentiate yourself. If you can make it tactile and texture pleasant in the hand, you will be well on your way. Make a card which has the potential to elevate your company over your competitors before the potential client has seen your site, and consider using business stationary to really stand out from the crowd. So, with that in mind we have brought together some of our best tips for creating effective, innovative business cards.

Remember basic design principles

It might seem obvious but it is worth mentioning that a business card is a piece of printed material just like any other. Because of this, the fundamental principles of paper-based design use to business cards:

  • Maintain all your key copy at least 5mm from the trim edge
  • Work at 300dpi for best image reproduction
  • Make Sure You maintain a minimal size to your typography to keep legibility
  • Style in CMYK unless you are working exclusively with spot colours

Many designers also find it helps to use a grid to lay their cards out, as this could enable you to achieve the ideal hierarchy of information in addition to make sure your orientation is sound (if you will need a reminder, have a look at our guide to grid concept).

Get creative within the limits

There are a few ‘standard’ sizes for business cards, depending on where you’re in the world (possibly because pocket sizes also vary slightly from country to country). 1 typical business card size is 55 x 85mm, though you’ll see a number of different sizes quoted on the net. Even though you just have a very small canvas, it’s still possible to get creative with the distance. Begin by thinking about the key information you need to include, which will typically be a name, telephone number and email address, then work your style around presenting this information in a creative manner.

Avoid common pitfalls

There are some common pitfalls to designing business cards, which it helps to be conscious of. The first and most obvious is to make certain you provide a bleed according to your own printer. This is often 3mm, but may be 5mm, so check! An Immediate way to add impact to your business card is to use a particular finish. Special finishes may include a foil blocking or metallic inks, and can add substantial cost to your print. What they provide, however, is the chance to make your card more tactile, visually impressive and memorable. If you’re uncertain how to approach this, have a look at our guide to creating special print finishes in InDesign. Different printers provide various options for endings, so talk to them to learn what they can do for you, and do not be afraid to visit a specialist if your normal printer only offers directly four-colour print.

Cut into your card

A great way to make your card unique would be to use a die-cut procedure to remove elements from the card stock, leaving a void. You may either use a die to change the shape of your card (by rounding the corners, by way of instance), or you can cut shapes from the centre. Dies are expensive to create the very first time, although increasingly printers are providing laser-cut choices, which make it economical to make a die-cut appearance on shorter print-runs. In addition, don’t overlook letterpress as an alternative.

Create Your Own

If you are feeling creative, why not create your own business cards? You can discover letterpress kits on eBay at affordable prices, letting you convert any card stock into your own business card effortlessly. Or you may use one of these gorgeous free business card templates.

Double-check your art

This tip applies to each piece of printing work you do, but it is so crucial that it is worth repeating for business card layout. When sending your artwork off to the printing shop, ensure you’ve double-checked each and every detail. There is nothing worse than getting your cards back and finding a typo in the email address or name!

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10 Photography Marketing Ideas That Work

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You have launched your photography business; but now you need to find a way to get yourself some clients.

 

Traditional advertising, like an advertisement in a magazine or paper, is mostly useless. Do not waste your money unless you are investing in something like AdWords. Especially when there are several free photography marketing ideas you can implement.

 

Instead, envision having people love your photography company so much that they send all their friends your way. Think of what it would be like to appear #1 in Google for your desired keyword, and also to have sufficient people finding you to fulfil your profit goals without anxiety and without spending thousands of dollars on advertising.

 

It can happen.

 

It may Just take some time, but here are 10 photography marketing ideas that work like mad.

 

1. Google Business Pages

 

When you search on Google and include a place on your keyword, such as “Madison Wedding Photographer,” Google is currently placing their Google Business listings before the organic listings in their positions. These listings are free, so go and get one today!

 

It’s important to fully complete your profile and start getting reviews if you wish to appear in the local listings. Be certain to upload some photos also, as they occasionally appear there in the search results. It’s a terrific way to boost your chances of being found on Google when people are trying to find a photographer.

 

2. Automate your Social Networking posts

 

Social Media sites, like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and many others can be super helpful ways to promote your company using digital copywriting.

 

That being said, you must be super careful not to waste a whole lot of time on those platforms since they can be extremely distracting. I mean I will go on Facebook to place a post on my business page, and an hour later I am seeing cat movies and forgot to post completely.

 

The Battle is real, friends.

 

So, in order to keep from wasting too much time, use a free service such as IFTTT to automate your posts. This lets you post in a single place and have it automatically post the exact identical content on other programs. This is the way to get the best response with the least amount of time wasted.

 

3. Write blogs as often as you can

 

Having fresh web page content on your website is among the best ways to let Google know your is website active (that provides you better positions) and shows your clients that you’re busy. When I visit a website that has not been updated in a month or two, I often wonder if they’re still in business. If you do not have many shoots, distribute your articles (do a couple of pictures one at a time rather than all in one big post) or reveal some private work.

 

It’s also extremely valuable to blog about things your customers want to know. By way of instance, wedding photographers might want to put a series on their site with tips for brides for getting better wedding photos (for example, hiring a professional lighting company or not getting ready in the church kitchen) whereas portrait photographers can post about what to wear to an interview. Providing information to your customers allows them to appreciate you and see you as an authority and trusted business advisor regarding the topic.

 

You’ll also want to be certain that your website is optimized for search engines so you can attract clients that are looking for a photographer like you by searching the net, this is something a web agency could help with.

 

4. Start building an email list immediately

 

The more I learn about email advertising, the more I realize I should have started an email list straight away from the very start. I am not talking about buying some arbitrary list that folks are attempting to sell you. I’m referring to people that are interested in your job and opt-in for emails from you.

 

The beauty of this email list is that these customers already enjoy your work enough to give you their email address. They wish to hear about your organization and about the products you’re offering. They might even love your job enough that they need to get an email each time you update your site with new photographs. These individuals are priceless.

 

Wish to do a day of mini-sessions? Tell your Email list and give them the chance to sign up a day until you start it to the general public. Have a new product you’re offering? Inform your listing about it and entice them to purchase it.

 

You can Use MailChimp for free if you simply send out a basic newsletter from time to time, that is the absolute minimum you should do.

 

However, I highly suggest using ConvertKit. They do have a modest monthly fee to use their service, but the automation they supply will easily cover the cost, and it is going to cost you less than your monthly Starbucks budget and that’s well worth it.

 

5. Offer referral bonuses

 

Word of Mouth advertising is one of the most effective things you can have for propelling your business forward. A way to help promote that is to reward people for telling their friends about your organization and how amazing you are. I like to provide either a free print or a specific quantity of printing credit for my customers for each friend they refer to us that books a wedding or session. This is not free to deliver, but I am putting it in my “free” list since it is possible to pay for it out of their profits from their buddy who might not have booked with you anyway. It’s free to begin and promote.

 

6. Network with other professionals

 

Get involved with other professionals in the community area. It’s awesome how faithful business owners may be towards each other when you really hit it off. Be sure to promoting their companies to your customers, and they’ll make sure to reciprocate.

 

If you are a wedding photographer, it is important to network with other wedding professionals because you share customers but do not have to compete to be the best wedding photographer.

 

7. Run a contest or a promotion

 

I debated putting this one on here at all because some photographers give their work away for free for too long, but a contest or giveaway here and there can really help boost visibility to your company.

 

My friend Andy and I gave away free wedding pictures to a couple annually for the first 3 decades of our company as a means to give back to people, and while it’s been an incredibly rewarding thing to do on a personal level, it is not something which brings in a great deal of extra business. Our target market can manage higher-end photography, whereas individuals who enter a competition for something free frequently do so because they cannot afford the luxury item. It was shocking to me how a lot of individuals still met with us and booked us while the competition was open, but our target audience would rather book us than wait for the results of a competition but maybe lose their date.

 

To do this to get more customers, you need to be certain you’re reaching your intended audience.

 

8. Have customers recruit their friends

 

Offering a free gift or a small discount to individuals who find a couple of friends to all schedule photograph sessions on the same day can be a tremendous motivator for people to locate others to hire you too. Again, we are harnessing the power of word of mouth advertising, but it is so powerful that it cannot be ignored.

 

9. Get featured on picture blogs

 

There’s a ton of wedding and portrait sites out there that feature photography, and there are a few portrait sites that feature portrait photographers also. Get featured if it’s possible, then market it where your customers can see it. There is nothing wrong with reminding them how amazing you are. It is simply some strategic business advice.

 

10. Give back to the community

 

This not only gets your name out there, but it makes it possible to build relationships with other Professionals who might desire your services or refer you to people they know. There are very few organizations who would turn down free photography policy for their event. Consider donating a session into a cause that is important to you. Or provide up a free session as part of a silent auction. The possibilities here are endless.

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How to Make Money as an Artist Doing What You Love

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Sharon Louden graduated with her Master of Fine Arts (MFA) from Yale in 1991 with $US115,000 worth of debt.

She has since settled all her student loans by selling her own art work, however it was not easy. As a professional artist, there was no roadmap to follow as she strove to pursue her craft and maintain a roof over her head. Enter “Living and Sustaining a Creative Life,” the publication Louden edited featuring candid essays by 40 working artists on how they make a living as an artist.

That kind of commercial talk is mostly absent in today’s art program. Dozens of MFA students are pushed to the real world with no clue on how to market their own work and themselves. Artist David Humphry said that the business side of art was very much like bathroom talk – very intimate.

The leading artists shared their stories of doing everything from painting houses and teaching to understanding and using Craigslist jobs and investing in real estate or undertaking home extensions to maintain their creative practices. Below are some tips on how artists create a living doing what they love move – being an artist.

  1. Network with artists, authors, and buyers

As uncomfortable as it may be for an artist to leave the sanctity of the studio, nothing gets marketed without interacting with authors that will draw attention to the art, the 500 or so well-to-do people who are considering buying art, along with the other artists that can give introductions to their art world relations. Think about it, when you were young, you would talk to everybody.

Your career gains its own momentum as soon as you start meeting people. Artists rely a lot on other musicians and you cannot miss that generosity. It is also very important to purchase other artists’ work. When times get tough, artists can sell the work in their collections or exchange on the notion of being an active participant in the market.

  1. Focus on your finances and make a budget

Take a look at your finances as it will save you in the long run. A lot of artists have the goal of wanting an art career and will sacrifice almost everything to the art. However, be reasonable with how you spend the money you do receive from your work. If it is choosing between paying your lease, installing timber beams or visiting Miami for an Art exhibition, consider your financial situation and perhaps sit the exhibition out.

By becoming more accountable, even if that means going for jobs that pay better, you are securing a greater financial gain. By primarily making money by selling your art work, but also working odd jobs that fulfil your imaginative practice allow you to develop your creative skills but also have money flowing in.

  1. Plan ahead and choose internships that count

If you wait to think about your career until you first graduate, you are already way behind. By interning in the industry you want to work in, such as an art gallery, not a warehouse that sells architectural timbers, you gain invaluable experience which are beneficial for your own self-promotion in gaining paid work in the future.

People just assume that if you’re at a gallery, all that work is sold and you are living well, but that’s not the situation. A lot of that art goes back to that particular person’s studio. Having gallery representation is not always the answer to economic stability.

  1. Open a gallery, treat it as a business

Contributing artist Austin Thomas started investing in real estate in Brooklyn, and a year and a half ago, she opened a gallery space in Manhattan called Pocket Utopia.

Owning your own business provides you the most flexibility whatsoever.  You decide when you’re closed and open. By opening an art gallery you may feel like you are even more influential in the art world since you might be selling other artists’ works thus attempting to create money for yourself and them.

  1. Get used to playing the real estate game

You may need to move your studio a number of times depending on competing businesses and your current situation. You may need to expand or perhaps downsize, however being flexible and understanding the real estate market is crucial.  Consider a house extension or add-on as a gallery as well.

  1. Only go into teaching if you like it

If you do not have a passion for teaching, do not go into it.  Many people see teaching as a ‘fall-back’ option but if you do not have a passion for it, it will make your job very unenjoyable.

  1. Make the Most of the down market

The art market crashed in 1986 with the economy. Leading artist Brian Tolle informed Business Insider, that although it wasn’t a great moment to graduate, the depressed economy meant the market was searching for affordable cheap options, where youthful artists flourished as a result. The expectations were so low that it was easier to break in and when the economy began to recover, they were already well set up.

Today Tolle regularly succeeds in creating work on the budgets of public art work committees. He often receives a flat fee that needs to cover his expenses and time in generating these huge projects. Tolle has three works he will install this spring: one in Canada, one in Houston, Tex., and one in Brooklyn.

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A Walk of Art

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Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

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Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

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There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

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Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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