A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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A Walk of Art

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Can a pair of shoes be considered a work of art? They can at least be a walk of art, according to Parasol Projects Gallery latest exhibition.

“A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes” explores the idea of whether a shoe that can’t actually be walked in can nevertheless be called a shoe – if it cannot, is it art? The display showcases approximately 60 designs by students and alumni of Israel’s premiere Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Additionally, it marks Bezalel’s first fashion exhibition. Those featured include Kobi Levi, whose shoes are worn by Lady Gaga and Whoopi Goldberg, Sigalit Landau, who is famous for suspending objects in the Dead Sea until they crystallize, Tal Arbel of Norman & Bella and Alessandro Briganti, who formerly worked with Alexander McQueen on designing the brand’s now-famous armadillo shoe.

Something about shoes as this mysterious object actually allows artists and designers to use this as a canvas to express social, artistic and design ideas. “A Walk of Art” curator Ya’ara Keydar, originally from Israel, has been operating with Bezalel for the last year to gather the exhibit. She is a graduate of the costume design program in New York, where she now teaches a class on fashion in museums.

Founded in 1906, the Bezalel Academy specialises in the making of both conventional and high-tech shoes. “A Walk of Art” juxtaposes handmade designs with technologically advanced ones, and lots of the shoes featured cannot really be worn. Some do not even come in pairs.

The artists turned to many different mediums — including timber, metal and glass — in producing the shoes, which come in various styles — stilettos, platforms, wedges, sandals, etc. Highlights include a 3-D-printed shoe by Arbel and Briganti, a design by Or Kolker carved from glued together chunks of leather and a ceramic shoe by Nimrod Gilo that is reminiscent of a particular Disney princess.

The concept of fragility and non-commercial substances bring to mind the fragility of the shoes of Cinderella. They bring the primary or mythical ideas society has had about shoes for centuries. The exhibition highlights the really interesting combination of fashion and art, desire and myth. Even though most shoes in the exhibition cannot be worn, that is not to say the artists don’t know how to make comfort shoes, they’re just far less appealing to exhibit.

The shoe business in Israel is quite Vibrant and some of the designers also sell their shoes all over the world. When they encounter the actual world, they understand how to make wearable, comfortable, commercial shoes. But what’s interesting is the way they learn how to do this is that they release all those bounds while they focus on creating new shoes.

 

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Why Wall Art Matters in Interior Design

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Too frequently in interior design, we see wall art treated as an afterthought. It is what gets dealt with last, long after the last coat of paint has dried on the walls and all of the furniture has been artfully arranged. But, we are here to assert that by relegating wall art to the side lines, you are missing out on a remarkable design opportunity. When selected thoughtfully, the ideal wall art can provide for the whole room. Dare we say it, but we believe wall art matters most in interior design. 

But if you’re a bit nervous to let wall art play such a prominent part in your design plans, do not worry. Use this post as a guide on how best to correctly choose pieces which will mesh with your current space and give you a harmonious interior. 

It Gives an Instant Color Palette 

Choosing a colour palette may be among the most daunting aspects of designing your interior. The number of different colours of paint which can be found at one of your local homeware stores can seem endless. It can be tricky to narrow down the choices to the colours that best match your vision to your space. 

Our best advice would be to leave the paint samples behind and concentrate on looking for wall art instead. As soon as you find a painting or wall hanging that you absolutely adore, you can use that bit as the inspiration for your room’s ultimate colour palette. 

Step one is to pick out two or three colours from wall art that you want to integrate into your house design. Pick the dominant colour, as well as a few additional colours that you want to pull out as accents. Then, search for all those colours in the things which you use to decorate your area. If you need more assistance, you may use a program like ColorSnap, which will enable you to match those colours to corresponding colours of paint. 

It Produces a Focal Point 

One of the fundamental principals of interior design is that each and every room needs a focal point, or one design element that will immediately draw the eye to the room and give the viewer a feeling of what to expect. An excellent piece of wall art could easily achieve this. Imagine your favourite artwork hanging over the mantle of a fireplace in your living room or standing proudly over the bed in your master suite. Alternately, a creative gallery wall could easily spice up a more conventional dining room or a few hanging tapestries could create a cozy feel to a seating area. 

When selecting a piece of wall art for a focus for your area, the main consideration is size. An artwork that’s too little will get dwarfed by the surrounding furniture and a bit that’s too large will look as though it’s spilling over. Be certain you take measurements of the wall space available, so you know how much space you’ve got at your disposal. 

It Creates a Sense of Texture 

Bear in mind that not all wall art is made equal. Though some pieces might be two-dimensional paintings or something similar, you should try to find art in various different mediums to help bring varying textures into the space. In addition to prints and paintings, you need to consider pieces such as sculptures or shadow boxes which may add some depth to the space. If your design is more avant garde, you can also consider doing a tiny mixed media installation that includes screens and electronic artwork. 

These additional pieces of texture can help add essential visual weight to your interior, which help determine the tone and texture of the room. Consider that rough textures are more inclined to make a room feel cozy and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone into the room. 

 It Makes The Room Appear Finished 

Think of some of the understated interiors that you have seen. Maybe a college apartment or a first adult space after completing school. Odds are that these spaces felt a little rough around the edges and seem unfinished. Odds are that they also had colourless walls. 

Wall art is the final element which could help pull a room together and make it feel complete. It’s that little extra touch that could take your space from just looking practical to appearing like it ought to grace the pages of an interior design magazine. The important thing is to select a piece of art or a wall hanging which fits in with the decorating design that you have already chosen for the space. After that, it’s all about selecting decor that you love and will be happy seeing hang on your wall for several years to come. 

Wall art shouldn’t be the final piece of the puzzle when you are decorating a new area. We believe wall art is the most significant element of interior design. This is because when it is used correctly, your wall hangings can provide a framework for how you choose to decorate remainder of the room.  

 

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Ways to Bring the Seaside Home

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

There are many ways to bring the seaside into your home, here are some ideas including fabrics and fittings right through to flooring and furnishings.

1. Key features

Natural materials are in the heart of the look — believe whitewashed woods having the look of seaworn substances, shaped and softened from the components. Or attempt painted wood in colors of blue, white or watery green, with strikes of bolder colour. Seaside-themed accessories will instantly conjure up a coastal sense — a set of oars or a weathered sign, possibly — but avoid using too many or the appearance might become clichéd.

2. Fabrics

Choose plain, textured heavyweight linens or homespun designs which have a traditional look, such as striped linens and cottons. Checks and utilitarian tickings are amazing options, or opt for published patterns with beachfront or nautical motifs. Fabrics such as denim (another fantastic utility alternative for drapes or upholstery) or faded florals are a trendy way to introduce color to a light scheme. Lightweight sheers also work well and come in many different designs, including embroidered or printed.

3. Colours

Use a blend of cool whites, greys and off-whites as a background, then introduce more attention, heat and life with sandy shades or smallish steps of stronger colors, such as coral, red, aqua, seaglass green or blue. For the best effect, start looking for tones which are slightly faded and look somewhat aged or bleached by sunlight.

4. Furniture

Driftwood pieces are fantastic for this style but can be tough to discover. Instead you can opt for things in reclaimed wood with a distressed paint or limed finish to make a beach coastal furniture feel. Woven things in wicker, rope, rush or jute look the part or integrate elements into seat seats or backs. Outdoor furniture, such as bleached teak or timber or folding metal fashions, used inside can have a similar impact.

5. Flooring

Wooden boards which were sanded back and treated with pale wax or lye soap to give them a silvery, worn look are simple but trendy. Porcelain tiles, that are stronger, are now available to mimic this appearance. Strong painted planks in whites, creams and greys (use floorpaint for best results) are another great alternative but are less hardwearing. Natural coverings — seagrass, sisal, coir and jute — have a textural appeal and are perfect used wall-to-wall or as bound rugs.

6. Texture

Aged, distressed and worn, or chalky, matt and rough — furnishings with these qualities are an integral part of the look. Rope, woven cording or hard sisal all talk of the seashore. Pick furniture or lampshades made from woven materials or include design features like a rope bannister. Use chalky matt emulsion paints or a reclaimed stone flooring or worktop for lots of surface interest.

7. Accessories

Rustic or older artefacts are great ways to present a coastal furnishings. Displays of shells, driftwood or storm lanterns work, as do marine artworks, seascapes and classic bird prints. A character table covered with gathered finds creates an evocative still-life, though a group of straw hats can muster holiday memories. Glassware arranged on shelves, a mantelpiece or windowsill includes a watery appeal — attempt blown-glass buoys, demijohns, bell jars or storm lanterns. Other components that hit a nautical note include maps and postcards, carved shorebirds or model ships and boats.

8. Lighting

For authenticity, go for styles which have a nautical heritage or resemble boats’ designs. Pick utilitarian fittings, enamelled pendant sunglasses or floor lamps and metallic finishes with a rocky aesthetic. Tripod lights, according to a theodolite, in brass and timber seem effective. Woven lampshades, and those covered in raffia or burlap, have a textural quality. Otherwise, opt for industrial-looking styles based on ships’ bulk-head table and lamps lighting with glass bases in watery tones.

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How to Plan the Ultimate Art Opening Night

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Ask anyone what they enjoy the best about going to an art show and many folks will tell you it is the opening night celebration. And who can blame them, after all, what better way is there to spend a day enjoying some brand new artwork whilst enjoying some alcohol like a fine yarra valley wine and partying?

 

So, while from a show-goer’s point of view the opening night celebration looks like a simple process — putting a selection of artworks in a gallery and then placing on refreshments and live music — there is a lot more to staging an exhibition (even a smaller series) than meets the eye. Months, maybe even a year, of planning and organising enter some displays and their opening night celebration, so in the interests of imbuing the curious with an appreciation of this procedure, here it is, a step by step guide to planning and staging an exhibition.

Planning

You may be amazed at the amount of planning an exhibition requires. Factors such as venues, budgets, funding, sponsorship, advertising and marketing, organising catering for functions, and maybe insurance, all require careful consideration. Lead times can vary considerably as a result, with a few displays taking a year or longer to install, while others can be organized in a few months.

Budgets, sponsorship, and funding

Staging an exhibition could be costly, and you’ll have to make certain you have enough funding, whether personal, or via sponsorships, to pay the expense of items like catering, advertising, printing, and gallery space. While established artists may have the ability to find sponsors to pay costs, as their bigger following ensures a fair amount of vulnerability due to their backers, new or emerging artists might not be so lucky, and will need to rely on savings or help from family or friends. Check around though. It could be possible to obtain funding through arts grants, and sometimes municipal councils or community groups may provide some help staging a show, whether it be providing a place or publicity. Artists at some exhibitions I’ve been to occasionally ask a for little (gold coin) donation to help cover costs, a part of which they generally donate to charity.

Finding a gallery

Gallery space is aggressive and can be tough to secure, especially in case you would like to exhibit at an established, well known, place. You’ll also have to weigh-up the amount, character, and dimensions, of work to be exhibited, contrary to the availability of appropriate galleries. Other things to consider are whether the gallery has an appropriate liquor licence to serve alcohol from wineries in the yarra valley and whether the gallery functions on a commission basis, taking a commission on works sold, or charges a fixed fee for holding a series. Also, depending upon where you are, since regulations differ from place to place, are insurance issues, both public liability, and paying for things on show. Look out too for alternative venues, like cafes or bookshops for example, which might offer wall area, and would definitely be delighted to collect a commission on any works sold. Given the prospect of custom and publicity, cafe and bookshop owners might possibly be ready to present other types of service for your show also.

Pricing your artworks

This is among the harder steps in the process of organising an art show. The amount you can request an artwork will be contingent on lots of variables including your reputation or standing as an artist. Clearly the more regarded your job, the more you may ask. Another is that the arrangement you have with the gallery displaying your work. Most galleries take a commission on works sold during an exhibition. Although this cut fluctuates, sometimes greatly, rates of approximately 25 to 30 percent are fairly common. Do not be afraid to pay attention to the commission either. If you think you will sell plenty of your job, you might have the ability to haggle a slightly lower rate. To set a price you’ll have to work out how much you want to get, against how much you really believe someone will pay, less the commission asked for by the exhibiting gallery.

Printing

As soon as you have financing, a place, and a motif worked out, you should begin organising the printing of promotional brochures and flyers, name cards, and a list or catalogue of the things you’ll be exhibiting. If cash is tight though you might have the ability to decrease some printing costs by doing some of the work yourself. Great looking catalogues and name cards could be produced with a word-processor, using great fonts, some cautious page design, and a reasonable printer. If you know somebody with calligraphy skills determine if they could help out, maybe by creating the name cards.

Promote and advertise

There are quite a few choices when it comes to promoting displays, many of which are cheap, or free. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make it easy for members to create pages for occasions, like an exhibition opening, and issue invitations for their contacts. There is also artwork focused discussion forums, and you may even think about approaching arts bloggers to find out if they will assist the spread of the word. Be careful not to wear your welcome out, or take anything for granted here. Setting up a page on a photo-sharing website, such as Flickr, and posting pictures of your job is also a fantastic way to generate some continuing profile. If your budget permits, consider printing flyers to post on community notice boards. Local stores may also be delighted to display these for you. Also, consider writing a press release to send to neighborhood and community magazines and papers. Finally, invite as many people as possible, as you can, to the opening. Not only will they love a drink and bite, but they will also add some ambience, and make your presence numbers look great. Nothing says success over a well-attended show opening.

Food, drinks, and catering

A big portion of the opening night of any exhibition is that of the food, drink and party atmosphere. Offering your guests a choice between a white and red wine, and water (and juice or soft drinks, in case you really need to push out the boat) is quite okay. If you have a generous host or even just a catering host (find a great café who offers catering in hawthorn and surrounding suburbs here), you might also have the ability to put on beer and some finger food. Wines and prepared meals are the best way to go when hosting an exhibition.

Other entertainment

Lots of the openings I have been to have some type of live music and awarded the air a DJ, or just a band. Obviously, if money, or floor area, dictates otherwise the only option could be background stereo audio. Whatever you do, choose music that’s light and upbeat, and creates a fantastic vibe.

Opening times

Many of the shows I go to usually open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays. Thursday seems to be the most typical day, it is not too early in the week, and not too near the weekend. Prevent openings over weekends, or earlier in the week, times that people normally have other plans. An early day opening of about 6 pm is likely an excellent all round time. Most your guests will be on the way home from work by then, yet it’s still early enough for them to fit your display in around other programs they have for later in the day.

Photos

You will surely need a photographic record of this opening, so attempt to arrange for someone to take photographs throughout the day. Post the pictures to your Flickr or Facebook pages, and also use them when you write about concerning the opening on your site later.

And enjoy

The opening night, and exhibit itself, will most likely be over in what feels like no time, especially if compared to the weeks of prior preparation, so make certain to take some time out to appreciate your own exhibition.

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Dream Career: Grad Designs Uniforms for Dolphins’ Girls Basketball Team

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Among the best things to take place in Stephan Devroe’s high school experience was not making the Whitney Young boys basketball group.

After his unsuccessful tryout, Devroe, then 16, ended up being a manager for the Dolphins’ national power women hoops team. He maintained his relationship with head coach Corry Irvin and other Dolphins workers over the years, even while he went to Baylor University, and while he began his own couture business: Campus Love, which in part develops uniforms, socks, warm-ups and other gear for basketball groups.

Devroe’s first customer became Whitney Young’s girls’ team, for whom he designed youth basketball uniforms for this year after a couple of seasons of making their socks and other apparel.

Devroe doesn’t just have one basketball client. He also makes garments for the De La Salle Institute’s ladies basketball group and socks for the Robert Morris University guys’ basketball team. He wants to expand the School Love line to high schools on the South Side like Chicago Vocational, Bowen and Kenwood.

Devroe makes all the clothing, with the exception of uniforms, himself at a factory in Roseland. Devroe always dreamed of having his own business, in the beginning he was unsure of what exactly that business would be. One thing was clear though, the Dolphins always backed Devroe’s dreams and always planned on being a future client regardless of what the business entailed.

Irvin was a supervisor for Baylor’s ladies’ basketball team, and he’s the sixth-grade kid’s basketball coach at Francis Parker School in Lincoln Park.

His love for basketball jersey design started at Whitney Young, where he took a graphic design class, and he’s attempted to mesh his love of hoops and style since.

Devroe believed it was a dream to get into Whitney Young in the first place after a youth in South Coast, a community plagued by shootings. He said he never seizes the day to develop for approved, particularly after losing two Whitney Young schoolmates to violent deaths. That consists of Rodney Kyle’s, a rap artist referred to as In Rod We Desire who was fatally stabbed in 2011, and Greg Tucker, a basketball standout who was fatally shot in Classy this year.

A few weeks prior to Tucker was killed, he sent out Devroe a text message that in part read something along the lines of: It’s cool to see somebody I have actually known for years doing something positive and something that he loves. That’s some real stuff brother.

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Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

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The Art Of Photography In Museums

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

camera-1549168-1280x960Shooting in Low Light

Light is typically dim in museums as this is more visually pleasing, and lots of museum art and design pieces can weaken with time when exposed to bright flood lighting and camera flash. Therefore, you have to set your electronic camera accordingly. Push the ISO up to a minimum of 400. If flash isn’t really enabled then utilize the widest aperture possible so you can hand hold the cam and utilize a fairly fast shutter speed. When photographing the actual displays, tripods may not be allowed as they can block other individuals’s ability to see the work.

Prevent Glass Reflections

Numerous exhibits are held behind glass, particularly artifacts, and valuable paintings. There are different things you can do to prevent reflections. Never use flash. For display cases, push the lens straight onto the glass with no gap, if this is permitted. By doing this you are bypassing any type of reflective quality from the glass– but DO give it a wipe to eliminate fingerprints in advance. If you can use a polarizing filter; it will decrease reflections. You might need to push the ISO up considering that many artifacts are in extremely low light conditions; ISO 1600 is more than sufficient.

Take notice of Details

Do not be afraid to move close to objects to get a significant effect. If you can get near the things then you can utilize a macro lens to select the details. If you are far away, use a zoom lens to get in close. Use a big aperture of f/1.8 – f/4.0 and a shutter speed of 1/100th of a second if you are using flash, 1/60th of a 2nd and slower if you cannot. Statues in custom showcases are inanimate but you can bring them to life when you zoom in near to their facial features.

Catching the Ceiling

Some museums have architecture that is as incredible as the art work being shown. Because this elaborate architecture is generally in the foyer you might be allowed to use a tripod. Turn the video camera upwards so it is dealing with the ceiling and try not using flash that is as bright as industrial lighting Press the ISO up to as much as 400 and even greater so that the camera can deal with little light and select AUTO without flash to see exactly what settings your electronic camera selects. Utilize your cam’s self-timer or a cable release to avoid blur.

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Why Conventional Business Strategies Do Not Work for Artists

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

Zssndhdioefijeiojfjehfffkjkdsjskdjfdjfjkkfsfjksdjdlfjdsjfkfjkjjdsjfklfkjfjlksjfsjfdsjfldsjflkdjfjdslfkjdsfjdkfjkdsjfsdjkfsjkdjfkj4kj474784787487847587485748574857847584758475847584757485748758475847547847587308203809849584958495894859485948989898392848259820358-034850983458-3485-8340580934n 0948n8098093485438n5vu345vn93485nv09438590vn9438n5vStandard business strategies usually do not work for artists. Why is that? This is probably due to the fact that Artists sell feelings. Feelings in their works of art, paintings, sculpture or even jewelry.

Artists are actually in the business of selling feelings and that is why traditional company business strategies do not work for them. That is likewise why artists do not see themselves as entrepreneurs. Artists really offer “items” that evoke the sensation, items that link the purchaser with their inner self. That’s of more value than a pair of new tennis shoes or the current technical gizmo. So large sums of money always have and almost certainly always will change hands in the art market.

So why is it that most artists do not see themselves as business entrepreneurs?

The confusion is fueled by the loud and unquestioned “but you’re supposed to be a starving artist” belief, one which is disrespectful and very harmful.

Paradoxically, this idea is continually propagated by the exact same culture and economy that values art so highly, which is roughly 3.2 % of the US Gross Domestic Product! So why else are the creators of these extremely valued “items” so baffled? I wonder if it’s due to the fact that an artist commonly can’t see beyond how they feel about their own ‘works of art’?

Why is that?

Since unlike standard businesses, artists offer products that reflect exactly what is deeply and personally significant to them. Target audience? That is not something they even discuss in art school. So artists do not relate to traditional business and conventional business does not relate to artists. Each camp is frequently outright hostile towards the other.

Artists believe that their values are far removed from business people and they do not speak the same common language. We usually dislike what we don’t comprehend and what intimidates us.

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Get Your Own Art Career into Gear

Author: Tanya Gutierrez

art into gearMany artists that I know would not consider themselves entrepreneurs or business people. But art is a business! Not many will experience Picasso-size deals in their artistic lifetimes, but there are still many ways artists can promote themselves and boost their income.

Stay with what works

The reality is, no one is going to make your career work for you. You are the artist, so you need to get your work out there in front of the public. One way is to send out laminated postcards for all your shows. People seem to collect them. Update your own website regularly (a great example is a plus size clothing website who does this well), get an email list established and design your own postcards for that individual touch. You should also think about showing in non-traditional places.

The reality is that putting up a website is not only a promotional tool, but it also acts as a catalogue (or kind of like a cheap storage solution) of your work for prospective purchasers. Think about this: if collectors can’t buy directly from your site, they can see what kind of work you have available but might lose interest if they move on to someone else’s site if they cannot buy then and there. So think about setting up some sort of e-commerce platform. If you don’t have the know how, find someone who does. You should have a presence at as many art fairs as you can, as this will give your work a major boost in terms of visibility as well as sales. You never know, one big sale at one of these art fairs could help finance many months of art-making

Another thing you can do to make things as streamlined as possible is to learn to do technical stuff yourself like IT consulting services. This means that you take your own photos and figure out the software so you can update your website. It saves on paying somebody else, but more to the point, what it really means is that you can take the time to get things looking exactly the way you want them to look. If you have to constantly explain to curators that your website isn’t 100% up to date it’s a huge waste of everybody’s time.

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