Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Month: December 2016

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

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How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Month: December 2016

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

Read More

Live-Edge Wood: Home Furnishings With a Slice of Nature

Month: December 2016

Live-edge wood, a slab cut from the heart of a tree with its growing edge intact, provides sculptural heft to integrated home furnishings such as kitchen islands, bookshelves and bathroom sinks. The natural appearance requires time. Master woodworkers dry the raw wood for several years to support and season the pieces. “Kids take 25 years– wood, the very same thing,” says Hisao Hanafusa of Miya Shoji, a standard Japanese carpentry workshop based in New York City. “Our work is beautiful due to the fact that we didn’t do it.”

Samples of live-edge products, from rugged to refined:

Philadelphia Office

A 4-foot-wide chunk of a monkeypod tree from Indonesia was sliced lengthwise to develop two live-edge pieces– each 9 1/2 feet long– for a desktop and a rack that curve around the corners of a comfortable household workspace in a city rowhouse. “The other edges are truly managed, really crisp,” stated designer Amy Cuker, of Down2Earth Style. Angled metal supports protect the slabs to the research study walls.

New York City Living Space

A centuries old fallen ash tree from upstate New York – sliced into pieces and aged for years in a drying shed – supplied the 9-foot shelf for a steel-cased library wall. “It floats, however it’s extremely grounded – it resembles the tree is still there,” stated Victoria Meyers, of Hanrahan Meyers Architects. She sourced the ash from Mr. Hanafusa, who shaved and oiled it repeatedly before collaborating shipment with the same time as the hot water service repairs – a difficulty in New York City. “It never fits in the elevator; you need strong muscle males to bring it up 8 floors. In some cases, we have to employ a slab crane,” he said.

San Francisco Kitchen Area

A 200-pound piece cut from the trunk of a claro walnut tree acts as an earthy bartop for a white-on-white cooking area. “The clients wanted to treat it practically like an object versus the white background– revealing it off like an artifact,” stated Carl Scheidenhelm of SF Architecture. The walnut, with its intricate feathery grain, was aged in a drying barn for six years prior to being sanded, completed and set up. Steel-bracket inserts, hidden under the slab, bolt it to the floor beside the blocked plumbing.

Bathroom, Berkeley, Calif

Paul Discoe, a master woodworker and builder based in Oakland, drew out the filigree quality in the wavy panel of live-edge elm he used to build a bathroom vanity, designed in partnership with designer Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Projects A+D. Mr. Discoe, who trained as a Buddhist priest before he began crushing wood from salvaged city trees and using drake low loaders, takes a zen technique: “Live-edge wood comes out of the Japanese idea of mottainai– it means not to waste,” he stated.

Read More

How Viewing Tech as Art Is on the Horizon

Month: December 2016

Innovation alters the human experience– that’s kind of the point. The Web Age has actually brought huge modification to almost all aspects of our experience, such as interaction, navigation, knowledge gain access to, and social life. These modifications are so extensive that they result not only in quantitative change– like the approximated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide– but qualitative, implying they force us to expand the meaning of these features of daily life. These standard functions of life have always been with us, but they are various now at a deep level and in such a way nobody could have forecasted accurately even twenty years back.

Among these modifications I discover most engaging is how technology like cloud services is altering art. “Art” is a rather basic term, however that’s appropriate due to the fact that innovation today is enhancing art in all its aspects: classical painting, the visual style of software, and guerrilla art for social modification, among others. Take a look at Prisma, the image manipulation app that has actually increased to prominence over the summertime. By integrating a neural network with a type of artificial intelligence, Prisma can take any average, ordinary photo and transform it into a masterpiece deserving of any significant gallery.

In a crucial sense, there is no difference in between imaginative technology and “art.” Both produce artifacts of human creativity and creativity. What sort of transformations can we make to our contemporary world by looking at an app or a product as not just an accomplishment of innovation, but likewise as an extension of creative expression?

Some amazing current hybrid jobs highlight this melding of standard art and advanced innovation. One example is the Malware Museum, a curated online archive that showcases the history of interesting trojan horse and other malware, presenting them as art pieces in a collection. It permits visitors to download examples and have a true malware experience– but without risk. “Through the use of emulations, and additionally eliminating any devastating regimens within the infections through software testing,” the site reads, “this collection permits you to experience virus infection of years ago with security.”

Another job, the “Brandalism” at the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, exhibited not only the production of art utilizing image manipulation innovation, but also the function of the artist as provocateur for changes in how we utilize technology responsibly. Artists unlawfully changed bus-stop advertisements with transformed ones illustrating brands as part of the climate modification issue, not the option.

Much of the business behind these brands sponsored the conference, so these guerilla art pieces were both real-time commentary and sharply pointed social criticism. In my mind, the truest type of art is that which encourages mankind to become better, therefore events like the Brandalism are inspiring uses of both technology and art directed towards an international concern that impacts us all.

NEAT: New Experiments in Art and Innovation, a 2016 display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, pulled numerous themes together. It utilized robotics, digital technology, and other media in nine artists’ works regarding how innovation is linked with all aspects of the human experience today.

Among the most aesthetically stunning examples of innovation and the fine arts boosting each other is a documentary in the making, “Caring Vincent,” a biopic about Vincent Van Gogh. The movie will be entirely made up of hand-painted images in Van Gogh’s distinct design, and his story will be told through characters and settings drawn from 120 of his own paintings.

All these tasks and others can supply important lessons and inspiration for advancements in the tech sector. The very first comes in regards to combining the left and right brains. Thinking as an artist requires creators to immerse themselves in the mindsets of the viewers and users, eventually benefiting both developers and users. Innovation based in just developers’ perspectives is neither art nor great innovation.

Using the creative method to tech and agile automated testing also indicates seeing each item as ongoing and iterative. An expression frequently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci refers to tech, too: “Art is never ever completed, just abandoned.” When an app is submitted to the App Shop, the work on that project has actually only just started. Feedback, bugs, market changes, and more determine that it continuously evolves.

A 3rd lesson art can impart on tech is in cultivating imagination. Creativity is key for software application business Comprehending ways to cultivate creativity and imagination can make or break these businesses. “Imaginative breaks” can increase imagination within a group. After all, it’s hard to believe outside package when you duplicate the exact same tasks and schedules every day.

The crossway of art and innovation will just become more powerful gradually. A years from now, start-ups will employ merely for a “creativity” consider prospects that will forecast how rapidly and effectively they can innovate using IT consulting.

Just like fine artists, tech sector employees will draw motivation and inspiration from nature, social issues, history, and obviously how technology impacts the human experience.

Check out http://observer.com/2016/11/how-viewing-tech-as-art-is-on-the-horizon/ to read more.

Read More